waxantiques

Charles (Frederick) Kandler

Charles (Frederick) Kandler, London silversmith, no record of apprenticeship or freedom. The identity of this highly important maker remains a mystery. Evidence points to Kandler being a German immigrant with possible connections with Kandler, the prized porcelain modeller at the Meissen factory, with whom he shared many similarities of style. Charles Kandler entered his first mark (New Standard and Sterling) in 1727 in partnership with James Murray however Murray died within a few months and Kandler registered new marks – New Standard (KA with a mitre above) and Sterling (CK with a pellet or mullet below in a shaped shield). He also used an unregistered mark (CK with a mitre above).
In 1735 a fresh set of sterling and new standard marks was entered for Charles Frederick Kandler. It is not known whether Charles Frederick was a nephew or cousin of Charles taking control of the family business, or even if they were one and the same man. A subsequent mark was entered in 1739. Kendler left a legend of outstanding works amongst which are the great wine cooler in the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg and the remarkable kettle in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

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Charles (Frederick) Kandler

Charles (Frederick) Kandler, London silversmith, no record of apprenticeship or freedom. The identity of this highly important maker remains a mystery. Evidence points to Kandler being a German immigrant with possible connections with Kandler, the prized porcelain modeller at the Meissen factory, with whom he shared many similarities of style. Charles Kandler entered his first mark (New Standard and Sterling) in 1727 in partnership with James Murray however Murray died within a few months and Kandler registered new marks – New Standard (KA with a mitre above) and Sterling (CK with a pellet or mullet below in a shaped shield). He also used an unregistered mark (CK with a mitre above).
In 1735 a fresh set of sterling and new standard marks was entered for Charles Frederick Kandler. It is not known whether Charles Frederick was a nephew or cousin of Charles taking control of the family business, or even if they were one and the same man. A subsequent mark was entered in 1739. Kendler left a legend of outstanding works amongst which are the great wine cooler in the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg and the remarkable kettle in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

  • 1759

    Charles (Frederick) Kandler

    10106 George II Antique Silver Salver

    £3,500

    A fine early English silver salver by the sought after maker Charles Frederick Kandler. Of square form, and raised on tall scrolling feet, this rare salver is hand engraved with an expansive outer border of scroll motifs, the centre with the crest of a dog with a tree behind. Super heavy quality and feels very good in the hand. Perfect to stand a bottle or wine glass on top. Weight 408 grams, 13.1 troy ounces. Width 16cm. Height 4cm. London 1759. Maker Charles Frederick Kandler. Sterling silver.

  • 1737

    Charles (Frederick) Kandler

    6318 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks by Charles Kandler

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    An important pair of early English antique silver candlesticks by the sought after maker Charles Kandler. Very fine quality and made of heavy gauge cast silver. In the French taste, each with a knopped baluster stem on spreading circular base with sunken well and shaped outside border. These stunning candlesticks are beautifully chased all over and each bears an armorial crest within the sunken well. Weight 1459 grams, 46.9 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Base diagonal measurement 16.25cm. London 1737. Maker Charles Kandler.

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