waxantiques

Serving Pieces

Serving Spoons, Basting Spoons, Ladles, Serving Slices
Asparagus Tongs, Grape Shears, Sugar Nips

Browse our collection of antique sterling silver serving cutlery. These beautiful pieces are functional and decorative on the table and also make excellent gifts.

As formal table silverware developed during the 18th century many different forms of serving pieces were introduced with very specific functions.
Long handled serving spoons have been in use since c.1680 and the early spoons had tubular handles. These are usually termed as basting or stuffing spoons; the earliest super large size is termed as a hash spoon.
Punch ladles were introduced in the early 1700’s and differ from other ladles in the fact that they have turned wood or twisted whalebone handles. Originally they had round bowls which were superseded in about 1735 by egg shaped bowls. Later on lips were added and after 1760 they were often inset with silver coins. Silver soup and sauce ladles date from George II period and later.
The first fish slice, made in circa 1740, originally had a triangular blade and these are now highly sought after to serve cake and pastries.
Asparagus servers with a serrated blade and chop tongs date from the end of the 18th century.
Grape shears are not found until the 19th century. These are often in presentation boxes and can have beautiful grapevine decoration.
Tea Caddy Spoons, for measuring out tea leaves, were made from 1780 onwards. Many can be found in novelty shapes such as the collectible jockey cap.

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Serving Pieces

Serving Spoons, Basting Spoons, Ladles, Serving Slices
Asparagus Tongs, Grape Shears, Sugar Nips

Browse our collection of antique sterling silver serving cutlery. These beautiful pieces are functional and decorative on the table and also make excellent gifts.

As formal table silverware developed during the 18th century many different forms of serving pieces were introduced with very specific functions.
Long handled serving spoons have been in use since c.1680 and the early spoons had tubular handles. These are usually termed as basting or stuffing spoons; the earliest super large size is termed as a hash spoon.
Punch ladles were introduced in the early 1700’s and differ from other ladles in the fact that they have turned wood or twisted whalebone handles. Originally they had round bowls which were superseded in about 1735 by egg shaped bowls. Later on lips were added and after 1760 they were often inset with silver coins. Silver soup and sauce ladles date from George II period and later.
The first fish slice, made in circa 1740, originally had a triangular blade and these are now highly sought after to serve cake and pastries.
Asparagus servers with a serrated blade and chop tongs date from the end of the 18th century.
Grape shears are not found until the 19th century. These are often in presentation boxes and can have beautiful grapevine decoration.
Tea Caddy Spoons, for measuring out tea leaves, were made from 1780 onwards. Many can be found in novelty shapes such as the collectible jockey cap.

Recently Viewed Products

  • 1758

    Elizabeth Godfrey

    9843 George II Silver Salver

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    Excellent large size. A fine early English salver with the square form and plain styling typical of the period. The hand engraved border has a detailed band of scrolls, shells and matting with mythical face masks to the corners and erupting volcanoes to the sides. To the centre is a family coat of arms within a decorative cartouche. Weight 2194 grams, 70.5 troy ounces. Height 3 cm. Diameter 40 cm. London 1758. Maker Elizabeth Godfrey, whose Huguenot origins can be seen in this piece.

  • 1735

    Paul de Lamerie

    9774 George II Silver Salver by Paul de Lamerie

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    A fine early English silver salver by the celebrated Huguenot maker Paul de Lamerie. Of square form, and raised on shaped feet, this exceptional salver is hand engraved with an expansive outer border of scrolls and cornucopias having to each corner a roundel containing the crest of a dog pierced with an arrow. To the centre, within a decorative cartouche, is a hand engraved coat of arms for the Knipe family with another in pretence. Weight 664 grams, 21.3 troy ounces. Width 22.5cm. Height 2.6cm. London 1735. Maker Paul de Lamerie. Sterling silver.

  • 1625

    Robert Profit

    9989 Charles I Antique Silver Bowl

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    An extremely early date. A rare antique silver porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form. The straight sided shape with a simple rim is the earliest type and in keeping with the early date. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Prick marked on the edge of the rim with the initials “MC”. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Diameter 10.3cm. Height 3.5 cm. Spread 14cm. London 1625. Maker “RP” possibly Robert Profit (David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”).

  • Circa 1784

    Hester Bateman

    7400 George III Two Handled Cup by Hester Bateman

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    An elegant antique sterling silver cup with side handles and raised on a pedestal foot. With the charming style for which this sought after English lady silversmith is famous. To the front is a hand engraved armorial crest. Weight 329 grams, 10.5 troy ounces. Contains 425 ml. Height 12.5cm. Diameter of top 9.75cm. Spread 17cm. London 1784. Maker Hester Bateman.

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