waxantiques

Candlesticks

Candle lighting is very popular with collectors and interior designers alike. Not only decorative, it creates an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Candlesticks, Candelabra & Chambersticks, Tapersticks & Wax Jacks, Snuffer Trays & Scissors
Oil Lamps, Wall Lights & Sconces, Lanterns & Chandeliers

From around AD300 to the late 18th, when oil lamps appeared, candles were the normal form of domestic lighting. They were made of tallow (animal fat) or beeswax. Wax candles were 3 times the price and indicated both wealth and social position. Candles were lit using a tinder box, or strike-a-light. A spark, struck from a flint with a steel, ignited a small quantity of flammable material. Candle flames were extinguished using a candle douter (or snuffer); either a small cone on the end of a long handle or a dual purpose scissor like tool which could both extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. Prior to the 19th century, when the self-consuming wick was invented, it was essential to trim the candle wick which would otherwise burn itself out. Tallow candles needed to be snuffed much more frequently than wax – 8 to 10 times an hour.

The old saying “early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” from Benjamin Franklin’s 18th century Almanack may have its roots in saving candlelight and thus saving money. Purchased candles were counted as luxuries even in well-to-do households.

Few domestic silver candlesticks still exist before the reign of Charles II and 17th century examples are usually made from sheet silver and are light in weight. Cast candlesticks started to appear circa 1685 and are much heavier in weight. The first loaded candlesticks appeared circa 1765 and are made of sheet silver, and not cast. Although many early candlesticks had fixed nozzles the first cast candlesticks were made without these useful drip pans. During the period c.1735-50 candlesticks with detachable nozzles appeared which facilitated much easier cleaning.

Hardly any silver candelabra survive from before the mid-18th century. Most candelabra have a detachable upper section which allows the candlesticks to be used on their own. Available in many different combinations, the smallest candelabra have just 2 arms with 2 or 3 candle lights and the largest could have an impressive 8 branches with 9 lights. In antique times candelabra use signified burning many candles at once, an expense justified only when a number of people met or when a large room had to be lighted. Nowadays candelabras are popularly used to create an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Silver chambersticks first made an appearance in the 17th century and early examples are now very hard to find. Originally they were made in sets as a household would need many chambersticks. They were used for lighting the way to bed and because of the movement created when they were carried about they needed a large drip pan to catch the wax. The earliest examples have straight handles (first flat, then tubular) which were superseded in the first part of the 18th century by a ring handle. Gradually the design evolved and from the mid 18th century onwards they usually had a matching conical snuffer although from about 1790 onwards some were made with an aperture at the base of the stem to take a pair of scissor snuffers.

Silver tapersticks, averaging about 5 inches high, are miniature table candlesticks used to hold a wax taper. Tapersticks were not used for lighting but melted sticks of wax for sealing letters or gave a flame for tobacco pipes or large candles. They are rarer than candlesticks and very few existed prior to the Queen Anne period. They usually appear in singles and pairs of tapersticks command a premium price.

The silver wax jack appeared circa 1775 and was a container or frame holding a long coiled taper treated with wax (sometimes turpentine). The wax was lit to melt the sealing wax used to fasten letters and documents and usually a personal seal was pressed into the hot wax to leave a personal identification. After the wax hardened it was virtually impossible to open the letter without breaking the wax seal. The wax jack could also used as a portable light such as the chamber stick or go to bed.

Silver candle snuffers and stands. Two different types of candle douters were used to extinguish the flame of a candle. The extinguisher which was a small cone on the end of a long handle and the snuffer which was a dual purpose scissor like tool which could extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. There were few snuffers made prior to 1700 and by the early nineteenth century more refined candles were introduced which no longer required the wick to be cut. Additional information available at http://www.oldandinteresting.com/tallow-candles-snuffers.aspx. Snuffer trays are usually rectangular or oval shaped and can sometimes be raised on feet or have a carrying handle. Some early stands, called standing snuffers, are shaped like a candlestick with a side carrying handle and a hole at the top where the point of the snuffer scissors is inserted – these were very quickly superseded by the flat snuffer tray and scissors. It is rare now to find matching snuffers and base. Snuffers and trays were usually made by different specialists so even though the dates match, the makers will probably be different.

The 17th and 18th century lantern was very economical as it shielded the candle from the wind outside and from drafts when used inside the house, thus allowing the wax or tallow stick to burn more slowly and steadily. The archaic name, lanthorn, refers to the thin sheets of translucent horn used to fashion the sides of the early lanterns before they were made of glass.

Wall Sconces were wall lights with a back plate from which a ”branch” or candle socket extended. The back plate, usually of mirror glass or polished metal, reflected light back into a room and magnified the light from each candle. The back or wall plate also afforded some protection from drafts. The term itself comes from the old French word esconse, meaning lantern or hiding place and from the Dutch word, schans, for protection or cover.

The use of oil lamps dates back to ancient times and there are Greek and Egyptian lamps which date back to the 3rd century BC. The oil lamp was used as an alternative to candles and produced light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. In small towns and rural areas they remained in use until well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified and light bulbs could be used.

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Candlesticks

Candle lighting is very popular with collectors and interior designers alike. Not only decorative, it creates an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Candlesticks, Candelabra & Chambersticks, Tapersticks & Wax Jacks, Snuffer Trays & Scissors
Oil Lamps, Wall Lights & Sconces, Lanterns & Chandeliers

From around AD300 to the late 18th, when oil lamps appeared, candles were the normal form of domestic lighting. They were made of tallow (animal fat) or beeswax. Wax candles were 3 times the price and indicated both wealth and social position. Candles were lit using a tinder box, or strike-a-light. A spark, struck from a flint with a steel, ignited a small quantity of flammable material. Candle flames were extinguished using a candle douter (or snuffer); either a small cone on the end of a long handle or a dual purpose scissor like tool which could both extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. Prior to the 19th century, when the self-consuming wick was invented, it was essential to trim the candle wick which would otherwise burn itself out. Tallow candles needed to be snuffed much more frequently than wax – 8 to 10 times an hour.

The old saying “early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” from Benjamin Franklin’s 18th century Almanack may have its roots in saving candlelight and thus saving money. Purchased candles were counted as luxuries even in well-to-do households.

Few domestic silver candlesticks still exist before the reign of Charles II and 17th century examples are usually made from sheet silver and are light in weight. Cast candlesticks started to appear circa 1685 and are much heavier in weight. The first loaded candlesticks appeared circa 1765 and are made of sheet silver, and not cast. Although many early candlesticks had fixed nozzles the first cast candlesticks were made without these useful drip pans. During the period c.1735-50 candlesticks with detachable nozzles appeared which facilitated much easier cleaning.

Hardly any silver candelabra survive from before the mid-18th century. Most candelabra have a detachable upper section which allows the candlesticks to be used on their own. Available in many different combinations, the smallest candelabra have just 2 arms with 2 or 3 candle lights and the largest could have an impressive 8 branches with 9 lights. In antique times candelabra use signified burning many candles at once, an expense justified only when a number of people met or when a large room had to be lighted. Nowadays candelabras are popularly used to create an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Silver chambersticks first made an appearance in the 17th century and early examples are now very hard to find. Originally they were made in sets as a household would need many chambersticks. They were used for lighting the way to bed and because of the movement created when they were carried about they needed a large drip pan to catch the wax. The earliest examples have straight handles (first flat, then tubular) which were superseded in the first part of the 18th century by a ring handle. Gradually the design evolved and from the mid 18th century onwards they usually had a matching conical snuffer although from about 1790 onwards some were made with an aperture at the base of the stem to take a pair of scissor snuffers.

Silver tapersticks, averaging about 5 inches high, are miniature table candlesticks used to hold a wax taper. Tapersticks were not used for lighting but melted sticks of wax for sealing letters or gave a flame for tobacco pipes or large candles. They are rarer than candlesticks and very few existed prior to the Queen Anne period. They usually appear in singles and pairs of tapersticks command a premium price.

The silver wax jack appeared circa 1775 and was a container or frame holding a long coiled taper treated with wax (sometimes turpentine). The wax was lit to melt the sealing wax used to fasten letters and documents and usually a personal seal was pressed into the hot wax to leave a personal identification. After the wax hardened it was virtually impossible to open the letter without breaking the wax seal. The wax jack could also used as a portable light such as the chamber stick or go to bed.

Silver candle snuffers and stands. Two different types of candle douters were used to extinguish the flame of a candle. The extinguisher which was a small cone on the end of a long handle and the snuffer which was a dual purpose scissor like tool which could extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. There were few snuffers made prior to 1700 and by the early nineteenth century more refined candles were introduced which no longer required the wick to be cut. Additional information available at http://www.oldandinteresting.com/tallow-candles-snuffers.aspx. Snuffer trays are usually rectangular or oval shaped and can sometimes be raised on feet or have a carrying handle. Some early stands, called standing snuffers, are shaped like a candlestick with a side carrying handle and a hole at the top where the point of the snuffer scissors is inserted – these were very quickly superseded by the flat snuffer tray and scissors. It is rare now to find matching snuffers and base. Snuffers and trays were usually made by different specialists so even though the dates match, the makers will probably be different.

The 17th and 18th century lantern was very economical as it shielded the candle from the wind outside and from drafts when used inside the house, thus allowing the wax or tallow stick to burn more slowly and steadily. The archaic name, lanthorn, refers to the thin sheets of translucent horn used to fashion the sides of the early lanterns before they were made of glass.

Wall Sconces were wall lights with a back plate from which a ”branch” or candle socket extended. The back plate, usually of mirror glass or polished metal, reflected light back into a room and magnified the light from each candle. The back or wall plate also afforded some protection from drafts. The term itself comes from the old French word esconse, meaning lantern or hiding place and from the Dutch word, schans, for protection or cover.

The use of oil lamps dates back to ancient times and there are Greek and Egyptian lamps which date back to the 3rd century BC. The oil lamp was used as an alternative to candles and produced light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. In small towns and rural areas they remained in use until well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified and light bulbs could be used.

  • 1663

    Thomas Hughes

    9350 Antique Charles II Pillar Candlestick

    £12,500

    An extremely rare early English silver candlestick from the reign of Charles II. It has a triple pillar column and square stepped base, all with a silver gilt finish. The base is engraved with two contemporary armorials and the motto “Manus Iusta Mardus” for the Maynard family*. Weight 638 grams, 20.5 troy ounces. Height 23.3cm. base 18.3cm square. Stamped underneath in three corners for London 1663. Maker possibly Thomas Hughes* (courtesy of Dr David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”). Sterling silver.

  • 1701

    Thomas Brydon

    9759 William III Silver Snuffer Scissors

    Sold

    A rare early English silver candle douter, also called a wick trimmer, with the simple plain style typical of the period. *Britannia standard silver. Weight 94 grams, 3 troy ounces. Length 15.9cm. Width 5.5cm. London 1701. Few snuffers were made prior to 1700. Maker Thomas Brydon, see Jackson’s Silver & Gold Marks page 154, a known snuffers and stand maker.

  • 1703

    Richard Syng

    9427 Queen Anne Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Sold

    A rare pair of early antique silver candlesticks dating from the reign of Queen Anne. Britannia standard silver*. Good size and weight. These fine candlesticks stand on square canted corner bases with reed columns and multiple gadroon borders. Fixed circular candle sconces. To the front is a large decorative cartouche, typical for this style. Weight 730 grams, 23.4 troy ounces. Height 23cm. Base 14.2×14.2 cms. London 1703. Maker Richard Syng.

  • 1713

    Thomas Folkingham

    9770 Queen Anne Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £8,750

    A rare pair of antique English silver candlesticks from the early 1700’s. Britannia standard silver*. Very solid cast silver with octagonal form and baluster columns. Lovely plain style in keeping with the period. Each stick bears a hand engraved lion crest, for the Turnor family, on the base. Excellent colour. Weight 671 grams, 21.5 troy ounces. Height 17.5 cms. Base 10.3 cms square. London 1713. Maker Thomas Folkingham.

    These make a matching set of four with #9767.

  • 1713

    Thomas Folkingham

    9767 Queen Anne Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £8,750

    A rare pair of antique English silver candlesticks from the early 1700’s. Britannia standard silver*. Very solid cast silver with octagonal form and baluster columns. Lovely plain style in keeping with the period. Each stick bears a hand engraved lion crest, for the Turnor family, on the base. Excellent colour. Weight 707 grams, 22.7 troy ounces. Height 17.5 cms. Base 10.3 cms square. London 1713. Maker Thomas Folkingham.

    These make a matching set of four with #9770.

  • Circa 1716 - 1730

    Georg Matthias Einboke

    9986 Antique German Silver Candlesticks

    £2,750

    A handsome pair of antique silver candle holders of plain, early design with knopped columns, shaped bases and detachable nozzles. Each has a monogram in old fashioned script inscribed inside the sunken well. Total weight 643 grams, 20.6 troy ounces. Height 19.8cm. Base 13cm. Braunschweig 1716-30. Maker Georg Matthias Einboke.

  • 1722

     

    9642 Antique French Silver Chamberstick

    £1,475

    A good quality antique silver chamber stick of early form having a long flat handle and broad drip pan. With the solid cast design and excellent heavy gauge silver as you’d expect from this date. Hand engraved to the front is an armorial within a decorative cartouche (worn). Weight 217 grams, 6.9 troy oz. Diameter 10.4 cm. Length 22.5 cm. Marked underneath with French silver marks for Paris, date mark “F” for 1746. Maker’s mark indistinct.

  • 1726

    Francis Turner

    9608 George I Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Sold

    An excellent pair of early English cast candlesticks of hexagonal form. Sterling silver. Good plain style and very desirable shape. Excellent colour. Heavy gauge silver. Each has a hand engraved crest within the well of the base. Weight 759 grams, 24.4 troy ounces. Height 17 cm. Base 10 cm. London 1726. Maker Francis Turner.

  • 1729

    John Eckford

    9069 Antique George II Silver Taperstick

    Sold

    A delightful little antique sterling silver taper stick of plain early design with baluster stem and square octagonal foot with a sunken well. Cast silver. Weight 116 grams, 3.7 troy ounces. Height 11 cms. Base diameter 6.7 cms. London 1729. Maker John Eckford II.

  • 1732

    Thomas Causton

    9967 George II Antique Silver Chamberstick

    £1,550

    An early English sterling silver chamber stick (also known as a go to bed) with a simple C shaped handle and reeded rim. Solid design and excellent heavy gauge silver as you’d expect from this date. Weight 256 grams, 8.2 troy ounces. Diameter 13.5cm. Spread 15.5cm. Height 6.5cm. London 1732. Maker Thomas Causton, a known candlestick maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1737

    James Gould

    9026 George II Silver Candlesticks

    Reserved

    A handsome pair of antique silver candle holders. Very attractive design with knopped columns and shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. Each has a hand engraved armorial within the well of the base. The detachable sconces are matching but probably made a few years later as candlesticks of this date were generally made without.Total weight 891 grams, 28.6 troy ounces. Height 18 cms. Base 10.2. London 1737. Maker James Gould. Sterling silver.

  • 1740

    Thomas Gilpin

    8646 George II Silver Candlesticks

    £4,950

    A fine pair of antique sterling silver candlesticks with faceted columns and shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. The sconces are hand engraved to one side with an armorial within a decorative cartouche, the other side with a crest. Underneath there is a hand engraved inscription. Weight 943 grams, 30.3 troy ounces. Height 18 cms. Bases 11 cms square. London 1740. Maker Thomas Gilpin.

  • 1741

    Elizabeth Godfrey

    9910 Set of 4 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Sold

    An exceptional set of antique silver candlesticks in the French Huguenot taste. Fine quality and made of heavy gauge cast silver. The early rococo style bases are decorated with seashells, flowers and scrolls. Total weight 2,444 grams, 78.5 troy ounces. Height 20.3cm. Diameter of base 12.3cm. London 1741. Maker Elizabeth Godfrey.

  • 1748

    William Gould

    10101 George II Antique Silver Taperstick

    £750

    A delightful little antique silver taper stick with shaped base and shell corners. Cast silver. Weight 147 grams, 4.7 troy ounces. Height 12.2cm. Base diameter 7.2cm. London 1748. Maker William Gould. Sterling silver.

  • 1751

    John Café

    9216 George II Antique Silver Tapersticks

    Sold

    A delightful pair of little antique silver taper sticks with stepped bases and shell corners. Cast silver. One with a hand engraved crest. Total weight 290 grams, 9.3 troy ounces. Height 12 cms. Base width 7.4 cm. Marked underneath in four corners with English silver hallmarks for London 1751. Maker John Cafe, known for his candlesticks. Sterling silver.

  • 1751

    William Cripps

    9899 Set of 4 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £13,500

    A fantastic quality set of four antique silver candlesticks, cast in high relief with an unusual aquatic theme incorporating sea swirls and foam. Good size and heavy cast weight. The top of each of the bases has an intricately hand engraved armorial. The nozzles are original, rare for this early date, and click into place which is a nice feature. Weight 3723 grams, 119.7 troy ounces. Height 27cm. Diameter of base 14.7cm. London 1751. Maker William Cripps. Arthur Grimwade describes Cripps as an accomplished craftsman and versatile exponent of the rococo style who enjoyed considerable clientele.

  • 1752

    James Gould

    9421 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £2,750

    An unusual pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with a 6 shell base and detachable sconces. Very attractive design and heavy cast silver. Hand engraved to each foot and nozzle is the crest of a winged animal over a crown (worn). Weight 1072 grams, 34.4 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Base 13.4cm. London 1752. Maker James Gould.

  • 1755

    James Phipps I

    10109 George II Antique Silver Taperstick

    £750

    A sweet little antique silver taperstick with shaped base and shell corners. Classic style. Cast silver. Weight 137 grams, 4.4 troy ounces. Height 12.8cm. Base 7 x 7cm. London 1755. Maker James Phipps II. Sterling silver.

  • 1757 - 1759

    Jon. Jac. Baur

    9926 Antique German Silver Snuffers and Stand

    £1,250

    This mid 18th century silver snuffer tray is of triangular form and the wick trimmers, of silver and iron construction, fit snugly and precisely onto the shaped platform. Initial “S” engraved to the base of the stand. Weight of stand 118 grams, 3.7 troy ounces. Measures – stand length 21.8cm, width 8.8cm, scissors length 14.1cm, width 5.6cm. German silver marks for Augsburg 1757/9. Maker Jon. Jac. Baur.

  • 1760

    John Hyatt And Charles Semore

    9125 George III Silver Candlabras

    Sold

    A handsome pair of antique sterling silver candelabras with detachable 3 light branches and sconces. Very attractive design with a baluster stem and shaped bases with shell motifs. Heavy cast silver and good colour. The 2 branches can be assembled on one candlestick to make a 5 branch candelabra. Total weight 2755 grams, 88.5 troy ounces. Height 41.5 cm (3 branch candelabra), 48 cm (5 branch candelabra), 22.5 cms (candlesticks). Candlesticks – London 1760 by John Hyatt & Charles Semore. The candelabra branches were made later to match the candlesticks – London 1891 by Johnson Walker & Tolhurst.

  • Circa 1760

    William Cafe

    9440 George II Silver Harlequin Taperstick

    £1,650

    A rare and very charming antique sterling silver taper stick, the stem modelled in the form of Harlequin. Cast silver. Excellent quality. Lovely patina. Weight 134 grams, 4.3 troy ounces. Height 13.5cm. Diameter of base 6.6cm. London circa 1760. Maker William Cafe.

    This candlestick was produced over a period of about ten years, mainly by William Café and his brother John.

  • Circa 1760

    Frantz Peter Bunsen

    9944 German Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £4,850

    A stunning pair of antique silver candlesticks in the plain style typical of the George II period. Very heavy quality. The classic design incorporates square bases with fluted corners, baluster stems and octagonal vase sconces. Weight 905 grams, 29 troy ounces. Height 20.5cm. Width of base 12cm. German silver marks for the town of Hanover. Maker Frantz Peter Bunsen. Date letter E, circa 1760.

  • 1761

    William Cafe

    9919 George III Taperstick

    Sold

    An unusual antique cast silver taperstick of square based form. This little stick is lovely – superb condition and very attractive detail with deep gadroon borders. Weight 169 grams, 5.4 troy ounces. Height 15cm. London 1761. Maker William Cafe. Sterling silver.

  • 1762

    John Hyatt And Charles Semore

    9328 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £2,550

    A good pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with shell corners and detachable sconces. Very attractive design and heavy cast silver. Each has a hand engraved crest, both to one corner of the base and also to the front centre of the base. Weight 854 grams, 27.4 troy ounces. Height 20 cm. Base 10.7 x 10.7 cm. London 1762. Maker John Hyatt and Charles Semore.

  • 1765

    Ebenezer Coker

    10117 George III Antique Silver Tapersticks

    Sold

    A very attractive pair of antique silver tapersticks of substantial size and heavy weight. Cast silver. This unusual pair is particularly decorative having shaped, domed bases, gadroon edges and shell corners. Total weight 455 grams, 14.6 troy ounces. Height 16cm. Base diameter 8.8cm. London 1765. Maker Ebenezer Coker, known for his candlesticks. Sterling silver.

  • 1774

    Robert Jones

    9094 George III Silver Candlesticks

    £3,250

    A handsome pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with detachable sconces. Very attractive design with a decorative vase shaped stem and shaped bases with shell motifs. This design is repeated on the detachable sconces. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. These are a copy of an earlier design, probably custom made to match an existing pair. Total weight 920 grams, 29.5 troy ounces. Height 21cm. Base 10.8c,. London 177. Maker Robert Jones. There is a similar pair c.1735 in Peter Waldron’s esteemed work “Price Guide to Antique Silver”.

  • 1777

    William Plummer

    9975 George III Antique Silver Chamberstick

    Sold

    An exceptional antique sterling silver chamberstick of square form with decorative shell corners. It’s unusual to find a cast silver chamberstick at this date, especially with a tulip shaped sconce. Weight 355 grams, 11.4 troy ounces. Height 6.5cm. Length of base 14cm. Spread 16.3cm. Date 1777. Maker William Plummer.

  • 1782

    John Scofield

    9211 George III Silver Candelabras

    £6,750

    An excellent quality pair of antique sterling silver candelabra with elegant classical styling. Plain clean lines with fluted tapering columns and bead borders. The branches, snuffers and nozzles are detachable; the candlesticks can be used on their own. Good gauge silver, unfilled and weighs well in the hand. Weight 2328 grams, 74.8 troy ounces. Height 40.2 cm (with branches), 29 cm (candlesticks). Spread 34.5 cm. Candlesticks London 1782 by John Scofield. Branches, with lion and makers mark only, circa 1780.

  • 1784

    Daniel Smith And Robert Sharp

    8693 Pair of Georgian Silver Candlesticks

    £2,750

    An elegant pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with tall tapering and fluted columns on oval bases. Lovely classic plain design with simple embossed borders. Height 30 cms. Base length 16 cms, width 12.5 cms. Sheffield 1784. Maker Smith and Sharp.

  • Circa 1784

     

    9888 Antique French Silver Candlesticks

    £2,550

    A fine pair of 18th century silver candlesticks of tall proportions with bead borders and attractive leaf and scale decoration. Detachable nozzles. Each has a vacant sunburst cartouche. Total unfilled weight 941 grams, 30.2 troy ounces. Stamped underneath the bases with French silver marks for Lille, France. Maker’s mark “EL DV”. Circa 1790.

  • 1802 - 1804

    John Green & Co.

    9634 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £1,950

    An excellent pair of antique sterling silver candle holders of plain classical design. Having tapering acanthus decorated stems and circular bases with bands of engine turned and classical motif decoration. Detachable nozzles. Heavy gauge silver, Gross filled weight 2,215 grams, 71.2 troy ounces. Height 32.8 cm. Diameter of base 14.7 cm.. Sheffield 1802/04. Maker John Green & Co.

  • 1806

     

    10120 George III Antique Silver Chamberstick

    £1,550

    Fantastic quality and excellent size, this elegant silver chamberstick (or ”Go to Bed” as these are often known) has plain classical Georgian styling, broad shell and gadroon borders, and ribbed detail to the candle sconce. The nozzle and snuffer are detachable. To the front there is a large hand engraved armorial with a crown above and motto “Patitet Qui Vincit”. Weight 544 grams, 17.4 troy ounces. Height 10cm. Diameter 16cm. Spread across the handle 19.5cm. London 1806. Maker “WS”.

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