waxantiques

Candlesticks

Candle lighting is very popular with collectors and interior designers alike. Not only decorative, it creates an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Candlesticks, Candelabra & Chambersticks, Tapersticks & Wax Jacks, Snuffer Trays & Scissors
Oil Lamps, Wall Lights & Sconces, Lanterns & Chandeliers

From around AD300 to the late 18th, when oil lamps appeared, candles were the normal form of domestic lighting. They were made of tallow (animal fat) or beeswax. Wax candles were 3 times the price and indicated both wealth and social position. Candles were lit using a tinder box, or strike-a-light. A spark, struck from a flint with a steel, ignited a small quantity of flammable material. Candle flames were extinguished using a candle douter (or snuffer); either a small cone on the end of a long handle or a dual purpose scissor like tool which could both extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. Prior to the 19th century, when the self-consuming wick was invented, it was essential to trim the candle wick which would otherwise burn itself out. Tallow candles needed to be snuffed much more frequently than wax – 8 to 10 times an hour.

The old saying “early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” from Benjamin Franklin’s 18th century Almanack may have its roots in saving candlelight and thus saving money. Purchased candles were counted as luxuries even in well-to-do households.

Few domestic silver candlesticks still exist before the reign of Charles II and 17th century examples are usually made from sheet silver and are light in weight. Cast candlesticks started to appear circa 1685 and are much heavier in weight. The first loaded candlesticks appeared circa 1765 and are made of sheet silver, and not cast. Although many early candlesticks had fixed nozzles the first cast candlesticks were made without these useful drip pans. During the period c.1735-50 candlesticks with detachable nozzles appeared which facilitated much easier cleaning.

Hardly any silver candelabra survive from before the mid-18th century. Most candelabra have a detachable upper section which allows the candlesticks to be used on their own. Available in many different combinations, the smallest candelabra have just 2 arms with 2 or 3 candle lights and the largest could have an impressive 8 branches with 9 lights. In antique times candelabra use signified burning many candles at once, an expense justified only when a number of people met or when a large room had to be lighted. Nowadays candelabras are popularly used to create an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Silver chambersticks first made an appearance in the 17th century and early examples are now very hard to find. Originally they were made in sets as a household would need many chambersticks. They were used for lighting the way to bed and because of the movement created when they were carried about they needed a large drip pan to catch the wax. The earliest examples have straight handles (first flat, then tubular) which were superseded in the first part of the 18th century by a ring handle. Gradually the design evolved and from the mid 18th century onwards they usually had a matching conical snuffer although from about 1790 onwards some were made with an aperture at the base of the stem to take a pair of scissor snuffers.

Silver tapersticks, averaging about 5 inches high, are miniature table candlesticks used to hold a wax taper. Tapersticks would typically be found on a desk as they were not used for lighting; the melted sticks of wax were used for sealing letters, to give a flame for tobacco pipes or to light large candles. They are rarer than candlesticks and very few existed prior to the Queen Anne period. They usually appear in singles and pairs of tapersticks command a premium price.

The silver wax jack appeared circa 1775 and was a container or frame holding a long coiled taper treated with wax (sometimes turpentine). The wax was lit to melt the sealing wax used to fasten letters and documents and usually a personal seal was pressed into the hot wax to leave a personal identification. After the wax hardened it was virtually impossible to open the letter without breaking the wax seal. The wax jack could also used as a portable light such as the chamber stick or go to bed.

Silver candle snuffers and stands. Two different types of candle douters were used to extinguish the flame of a candle. The extinguisher which was a small cone on the end of a long handle and the snuffer which was a dual purpose scissor like tool which could extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. There were few snuffers made prior to 1700 and by the early nineteenth century more refined candles were introduced which no longer required the wick to be cut. Additional information available at http://www.oldandinteresting.com/tallow-candles-snuffers.aspx. Snuffer trays are usually rectangular or oval shaped and can sometimes be raised on feet or have a carrying handle. Some early stands, called standing snuffers, are shaped like a candlestick with a side carrying handle and a hole at the top where the point of the snuffer scissors is inserted – these were very quickly superseded by the flat snuffer tray and scissors. It is rare now to find matching snuffers and base. Snuffers and trays were usually made by different specialists so even though the dates match, the makers will probably be different.

The 17th and 18th century lantern was very economical as it shielded the candle from the wind outside and from drafts when used inside the house, thus allowing the wax or tallow stick to burn more slowly and steadily. The archaic name, lanthorn, refers to the thin sheets of translucent horn used to fashion the sides of the early lanterns before they were made of glass.

Wall Sconces were wall lights with a back plate from which a ”branch” or candle socket extended. The back plate, usually of mirror glass or polished metal, reflected light back into a room and magnified the light from each candle. The back or wall plate also afforded some protection from drafts. The term itself comes from the old French word esconse, meaning lantern or hiding place and from the Dutch word, schans, for protection or cover.

The use of oil lamps dates back to ancient times and there are Greek and Egyptian lamps which date back to the 3rd century BC. The oil lamp was used as an alternative to candles and produced light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. In small towns and rural areas they remained in use until well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified and light bulbs could be used.

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Candlesticks

Candle lighting is very popular with collectors and interior designers alike. Not only decorative, it creates an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Candlesticks, Candelabra & Chambersticks, Tapersticks & Wax Jacks, Snuffer Trays & Scissors
Oil Lamps, Wall Lights & Sconces, Lanterns & Chandeliers

From around AD300 to the late 18th, when oil lamps appeared, candles were the normal form of domestic lighting. They were made of tallow (animal fat) or beeswax. Wax candles were 3 times the price and indicated both wealth and social position. Candles were lit using a tinder box, or strike-a-light. A spark, struck from a flint with a steel, ignited a small quantity of flammable material. Candle flames were extinguished using a candle douter (or snuffer); either a small cone on the end of a long handle or a dual purpose scissor like tool which could both extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. Prior to the 19th century, when the self-consuming wick was invented, it was essential to trim the candle wick which would otherwise burn itself out. Tallow candles needed to be snuffed much more frequently than wax – 8 to 10 times an hour.

The old saying “early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” from Benjamin Franklin’s 18th century Almanack may have its roots in saving candlelight and thus saving money. Purchased candles were counted as luxuries even in well-to-do households.

Few domestic silver candlesticks still exist before the reign of Charles II and 17th century examples are usually made from sheet silver and are light in weight. Cast candlesticks started to appear circa 1685 and are much heavier in weight. The first loaded candlesticks appeared circa 1765 and are made of sheet silver, and not cast. Although many early candlesticks had fixed nozzles the first cast candlesticks were made without these useful drip pans. During the period c.1735-50 candlesticks with detachable nozzles appeared which facilitated much easier cleaning.

Hardly any silver candelabra survive from before the mid-18th century. Most candelabra have a detachable upper section which allows the candlesticks to be used on their own. Available in many different combinations, the smallest candelabra have just 2 arms with 2 or 3 candle lights and the largest could have an impressive 8 branches with 9 lights. In antique times candelabra use signified burning many candles at once, an expense justified only when a number of people met or when a large room had to be lighted. Nowadays candelabras are popularly used to create an intimate atmosphere at the dining table allowing friends and acquaintances to converse across the flickering lights.

Silver chambersticks first made an appearance in the 17th century and early examples are now very hard to find. Originally they were made in sets as a household would need many chambersticks. They were used for lighting the way to bed and because of the movement created when they were carried about they needed a large drip pan to catch the wax. The earliest examples have straight handles (first flat, then tubular) which were superseded in the first part of the 18th century by a ring handle. Gradually the design evolved and from the mid 18th century onwards they usually had a matching conical snuffer although from about 1790 onwards some were made with an aperture at the base of the stem to take a pair of scissor snuffers.

Silver tapersticks, averaging about 5 inches high, are miniature table candlesticks used to hold a wax taper. Tapersticks would typically be found on a desk as they were not used for lighting; the melted sticks of wax were used for sealing letters, to give a flame for tobacco pipes or to light large candles. They are rarer than candlesticks and very few existed prior to the Queen Anne period. They usually appear in singles and pairs of tapersticks command a premium price.

The silver wax jack appeared circa 1775 and was a container or frame holding a long coiled taper treated with wax (sometimes turpentine). The wax was lit to melt the sealing wax used to fasten letters and documents and usually a personal seal was pressed into the hot wax to leave a personal identification. After the wax hardened it was virtually impossible to open the letter without breaking the wax seal. The wax jack could also used as a portable light such as the chamber stick or go to bed.

Silver candle snuffers and stands. Two different types of candle douters were used to extinguish the flame of a candle. The extinguisher which was a small cone on the end of a long handle and the snuffer which was a dual purpose scissor like tool which could extinguish the candle flame and also cut the wick of the candle for reuse. There were few snuffers made prior to 1700 and by the early nineteenth century more refined candles were introduced which no longer required the wick to be cut. Additional information available at http://www.oldandinteresting.com/tallow-candles-snuffers.aspx. Snuffer trays are usually rectangular or oval shaped and can sometimes be raised on feet or have a carrying handle. Some early stands, called standing snuffers, are shaped like a candlestick with a side carrying handle and a hole at the top where the point of the snuffer scissors is inserted – these were very quickly superseded by the flat snuffer tray and scissors. It is rare now to find matching snuffers and base. Snuffers and trays were usually made by different specialists so even though the dates match, the makers will probably be different.

The 17th and 18th century lantern was very economical as it shielded the candle from the wind outside and from drafts when used inside the house, thus allowing the wax or tallow stick to burn more slowly and steadily. The archaic name, lanthorn, refers to the thin sheets of translucent horn used to fashion the sides of the early lanterns before they were made of glass.

Wall Sconces were wall lights with a back plate from which a ”branch” or candle socket extended. The back plate, usually of mirror glass or polished metal, reflected light back into a room and magnified the light from each candle. The back or wall plate also afforded some protection from drafts. The term itself comes from the old French word esconse, meaning lantern or hiding place and from the Dutch word, schans, for protection or cover.

The use of oil lamps dates back to ancient times and there are Greek and Egyptian lamps which date back to the 3rd century BC. The oil lamp was used as an alternative to candles and produced light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. In small towns and rural areas they remained in use until well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified and light bulbs could be used.

  • 1695

    Edward Gibson

    10289 William III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £9,500

    A rare pair of early English silver candlesticks with square bases and lobed, gadroon decoration. Excellent quality and heavy gauge of silver. Hand engraved on the base with cypher initials below the coronet of a count (continental european). The technique of making cast silver sticks was introduced into England circa 1685 and this is one of the early designs. Weight 605 grams, 19.4 troy ounces. Height 14cm. Base 9.9cm. London 1695. Maker Edward Gibson. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1701

    Thomas Brydon

    10371 William III Silver Snuffer Scissors

    Sold

    A rare early English silver candle douter, also called a wick trimmer, with the simple plain style typical of the period. *Britannia standard silver. Weight 94 grams, 3 troy ounces. Length 15.9cm. Width 5.5cm. London 1701. Few snuffers were made prior to 1700. Maker Thomas Brydon, see Jackson’s Silver & Gold Marks page 154, a known snuffers and stand maker.

  • 1702

    Thomas Prichard

    10278 Queen Anne Antique Silver Tapersticks

    Sold

    A stunning pair of little antique silver tapersticks with square bases and lobed, gadroon decoration. Superb quality. Lovely crisp finish. The technique of making cast silver sticks was introduced into England circa 1685 and this is one of the early designs. Weight 267 grams, 8.5 troy ounces. Height 9.8cm. Base 6.8cm. London 1702. Maker Thomas Prichard. Britannia standard silver. 18th century.

  • 1706 - 1718

    Matthew Cooper

    10255 Queen Anne Antique Silver Snuffers and Stand

    Sold

    A rare early English silver snuffers and stand dating to the early 1700’s. The base, with a cast hexagonal stepped base and baluster stem, has the typical style of the candlesticks of this period. The snuffer scissors, known also as wick trimmers, sit longways in the stand, and the pointed end fits snugly into the stand’s retaining slot. Total weight 328 grams, 10.5 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Stand height 13.5cm, base diameter 7.8cm. Scissors length 14.7cm. London 1706/1718. Maker Matthew Cooper. *Britannia standard silver. 18th century

  • 1710

    Thomas Merry

    10173 Queen Anne Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £6,950

    A highly desirable pair of antique English silver candlesticks from the early 1700’s with octagonal form and baluster columns. This lovely plain style is fully in keeping with the period. Very solid cast silver. Good patina. Total weight 677 grams, 21.7 troy ounces. Height 18.8cm. Base 11.8cm wide. London 1710. Maker Thomas Merry I, specialist candlestick maker. Britannia standard silver*.

  • 1712

    Joseph Bird

    10232 Queen Anne Antique Silver Tapersticks

    £5,850

    A rare pair of dainty little antique silver tapersticks with the desirable octagonal shape. Superb quality. Lovely crisp finish. The straight lined form features a faceted sconce and foot and a plain knopped tapering stem. Total weight 200 grams, 6.4 troy ounces. Height 12cm. Base diameter 7.1cm. London 1712. Maker Joseph Bird. Britannia standard silver. 18th century.

  • 1713

    Thomas Folkingham

    9767 Queen Anne Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Sold

    A rare pair of antique English silver candlesticks from the early 1700’s. Britannia standard silver*. Very solid cast silver with octagonal form and baluster columns. Lovely plain style in keeping with the period. Each stick bears a hand engraved lion crest, for the Turnor family, on the base. Excellent colour. Weight 707 grams, 22.7 troy ounces. Height 17.5 cms. Base 10.3 cms square. London 1713. Maker Thomas Folkingham.

    These make a matching set of four with #9770.

  • Circa 1716 - 1730

    Georg Matthias Einboke

    9986 Antique German Silver Candlesticks

    £2,250

    A handsome pair of antique silver candle holders of plain, early design with knopped columns, shaped bases and detachable nozzles. Each has a monogram in old fashioned script inscribed inside the sunken well. Total weight 643 grams, 20.6 troy ounces. Height 19.8cm. Base 13cm. Braunschweig 1716-30. Maker Georg Matthias Einboke.

  • 1724

    John Bache

    10302 George I Antique Silver Tapersticks

    £3,350

    A delightful pair of little antique silver taper sticks with the plain hexagonal design typical of the early 1700’s. Cast silver. Total weight 235 grams, 7.5 troy ounces. Height 11.4cm. Base measures 7 x 8cm. London 1724. Maker John Bache. Britannia standard silver – 95.8% purity*. 18th century.

  • 1725

    Matthew Cooper

    10334 George I Antique Silver Snuffer Set

    Sold

    A very rare all-matching 4 piece silver desk set. It is extremely unusual to find a complete set of this early date. The suite consists of silver candlesticks, silver snuffer tray and silver snuffer scissors. All with a matching hand engraved boar crest. Lovely plain style in keeping with the period. Cast candlesticks – the square shaped bases with incuse corners. Weight 785g, 25.2 troy oz. Height 15.4cm. Base 10.4cm. Snuffer stand – of square shaped form with incuse corners, raised on four ball feet. Weight 156g, 5 troy oz. Length 15.5 x 7.6cm. Candle snuffer scissors – the simple open and shut mechanism retains the original steel cutting plates. Weight 62g, 2 troy oz. Length 12.2cm. London 1725. Maker Matthew Cooper I. Sterling silver.

  • 1725

    John Eckford

    10366 George II Antique Silver Taperstick

    £895

    A pretty little antique silver taperstick with knopped stem and shaped rectangular base. Nice plain style. Hand engraved initials “ERB” in old fashioned script to the foot. Cast silver. Weight 154 grams, 4.9 troy oz. Height 10.5cm. Diameter of base 6.7cm. London 1725. Maker John Eckford. Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1726

     

    10220 Antique Continental Silver Candlesticks

    £1,750

    An early pair of solid silver candlesticks with baluster columns and spreading bases with sunken wells. This style is typical of early 18th century English candlesticks. Excellent colour. Each has a hand engraved initial “R” to the top of the base and a contemporary inscription below. Total weight 338 grams, 10.8 troy oz. Height 16cm. Diameter of base 11.1cm. Continental. Circa 1726.

  • 1727

    James Gould

    10356 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Reserved

    A handsome pair of antique silver candle holders. Very attractive design with faceted columns and shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. Total weight 721g, 23.1 troy ounces. Height 16.5cm. Base 10.3cm. London 1727 (first year of George II). Maker James Gould. Sterling silver.

  • 1730

    John Bache

    10363 George II Antique Silver Taperstick

    £1,050

    A delightful little antique silver taper stick of plain early design with baluster stem and square octagonal foot with a sunken well. Nice plain style and straight lines. Cast silver. Hand engraved within the well is a “hand” crest. Weight 94g, 3.0 troy oz. Height 10.5cm. Base diameter 6.5cm. London 1730. Maker John Bache. Sterling silver. This taperstick would make a good pair with #10360 (minor differences).

  • 1732

    Thomas Causton

    9967 George II Antique Silver Chamberstick

    Sold

    An early English sterling silver chamber stick (also known as a go to bed) with a simple C shaped handle and reeded rim. Solid design and excellent heavy gauge silver as you’d expect from this date. Weight 256 grams, 8.2 troy ounces. Diameter 13.5cm. Spread 15.5cm. Height 6.5cm. London 1732. Maker Thomas Causton, a known candlestick maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1734

    William Gould

    10317 George II Antique Silver Taperstick

    Sold

    A pretty little antique silver taperstick with knopped stem and shaped rectangular base. Nice plain style. Cast silver. Hand engraved to the front with intertwined initials in old fashioned script. Weight 114 grams, 3.6 troy ounces. Height 10.6cm. Diameter of base 6.7cm. London 1734. Maker William Gould. Sterling silver.

  • 1742

    William Gould

    10152 Set of George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £5,650

    This plain design, typical of the period, is enhanced by the unusual feature of the naturalistic shell corners. A handsome set of four antique silver candlesticks with baluster stems and shaped square bases. Heavy gauge cast silver. Each foot has a hand engraved armorial. Total weight 1,940 grams, 62.3 troy ounces. Height 19.5cm. Diameter of base 11cm. London 1742. Maker William Gould, specialist candlestick maker and great exponent of rococo silver. Sterling silver.

  • 1746

     

    9642 Antique French Silver Chamberstick

    £950

    A good quality antique silver chamber stick of early form having a long flat handle and broad drip pan. With the solid cast design and excellent heavy gauge silver as you’d expect from this date. Hand engraved to the front is an armorial within a decorative cartouche (worn). Weight 217 grams, 6.9 troy oz. Diameter 10.4 cm. Length 22.5 cm. Marked underneath with French silver marks for Paris, date mark “F” for 1746. Maker’s mark indistinct.

  • 1749

    David Willaume II

    10146 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £5,950

    An excellent quality pair of antique silver candlesticks of baluster design with shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. Each is hand engraved within the well of the base with an insignia containing the royal motto. Weight 1171 grams, 37.6 troy ounces. Height 21cm. Bases 12cm square. London 1749. Maker David Willaume II. Sterling silver.

  • 1752

    John Café

    9421 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £2,750

    An unusual pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with a 6 shell base and detachable sconces. Very attractive design and heavy cast silver. Hand engraved to each foot and nozzle is the crest of a winged animal over a crown (worn). Weight 1072 grams, 34.4 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Base 13.4cm. London 1752. Maker James Gould.

  • 1754 - 1755

    John Café

    10149 George II Antique Silver Candelabra Set

    £19,500

    Antique silver candelabra from this period are very rare and the additional pair of matching candlesticks add to the splendour of this set. A fine set of two-light silver candelabras of naturalistic rococo design with removable branches, the candlesticks with large hand engraved armorials. The four candlesticks can be used on their own. All pieces are made of heavy cast silver. Weight 4597 grams, 14 troy ounces. Height 42.5cm (top of candelabra), 27.2cm (candlestick). London 1754-55. Maker John Café, specialist candlestick maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1760

    John Hyatt And Charles Semore

    9125 George III Silver Candlabras

    Sold

    A handsome pair of antique sterling silver candelabras with detachable 3 light branches and sconces. Very attractive design with a baluster stem and shaped bases with shell motifs. Heavy cast silver and good colour. The 2 branches can be assembled on one candlestick to make a 5 branch candelabra. Total weight 2755 grams, 88.5 troy ounces. Height 41.5 cm (3 branch candelabra), 48 cm (5 branch candelabra), 22.5 cms (candlesticks). Candlesticks – London 1760 by John Hyatt & Charles Semore. The candelabra branches were made later to match the candlesticks – London 1891 by Johnson Walker & Tolhurst.

  • Circa 1760

    Frantz Peter Bunsen

    9944 German Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £4,850

    A stunning pair of antique silver candlesticks in the plain style typical of the George II period. Very heavy quality. The classic design incorporates square bases with fluted corners, baluster stems and octagonal vase sconces. Weight 905 grams, 29 troy ounces. Height 20.5cm. Width of base 12cm. German silver marks for the town of Hanover. Maker Frantz Peter Bunsen. Date letter E, circa 1760.

  • 1765

    William Cafe

    10142 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    Sold

    A stunning pair of antique silver candlesticks of tall column form standing on square decorative bases. The pierced Corinthian capitals have excellent sharp detail, beautifully decorated with foliage and flower heads. The stepped square bases have broad gadroon borders enclosing flower and foliate ornament, and an interesting pictorial crest (worn). Removable nozzles. Solid silver with wood filled bases. Height 31.2cm. Base 13.4 x 13.4cm. London 1765. Maker William Cafe. Sterling silver.

  • 1774

    Robert Jones

    10378 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £2,750

    A handsome pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with detachable sconces. Very attractive design with a decorative vase shaped stem and shaped bases with shell motifs. This design is repeated on the detachable sconces. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. These are a copy of an earlier design, probably custom made to match an existing pair. Total weight 920 grams, 29.5 troy ounces. Height 21cm. Base 10.8c,. London 177. Maker Robert Jones. There is a similar pair c.1735 in Peter Waldron’s esteemed work “Price Guide to Antique Silver”.

  • 1782

    John Scofield

    9211 George III Silver Candelabras

    £6,750

    An excellent quality pair of antique sterling silver candelabra with elegant classical styling. Plain clean lines with fluted tapering columns and bead borders. The branches, snuffers and nozzles are detachable; the candlesticks can be used on their own. Good gauge silver, unfilled and weighs well in the hand. Weight 2328 grams, 74.8 troy ounces. Height 40.2 cm (with branches), 29 cm (candlesticks). Spread 34.5 cm. Candlesticks London 1782 by John Scofield. Branches, with lion and makers mark only, circa 1780.

  • Circa 1784

     

    9888 Antique French Silver Candlesticks

    £2,550

    A fine pair of 18th century silver candlesticks of tall proportions with bead borders and attractive leaf and scale decoration. Detachable nozzles. Each has a vacant sunburst cartouche. Total unfilled weight 941 grams, 30.2 troy ounces. Stamped underneath the bases with French silver marks for Lille, France. Maker’s mark “EL DV”. Circa 1790.

  • 1793

    John Scofield

    9390 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £5,500

    A fine pair of antique sterling silver candle holders with tapering acanthus decorated stems and circular bases with an engraved owl crest. Classic plain style. The nozzles have a shaped frieze. Heavy gauge silver, unfilled. Weight 1312 grams, 42.1 troy ounces. Height 33 cm. Diameter of base 14.2 cm. London 1793. Maker John Scofield.

  • 1802 - 1804

    John Green & Co.

    9634 George III Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £1,950

    An excellent pair of antique sterling silver candle holders of plain classical design. Having tapering acanthus decorated stems and circular bases with bands of engine turned and classical motif decoration. Detachable nozzles. Heavy gauge silver, Gross filled weight 2,215 grams, 71.2 troy ounces. Height 32.8 cm. Diameter of base 14.7 cm.. Sheffield 1802/04. Maker John Green & Co.

  • 1807

    James Turner

    9604 Georgian Silver Wax Jack

    Sold

    A rare antique sterling silver wax jack, or go to bed, of rectangular form. Good plain style and gadroon borders. The central wax winder supports the remains of a coil of wax, the end of which is held in place in the centre of the sconce. The small conical snuffer is attached to the top by a long silver chain. Weight including wax 163 grams, 5.2 troy ounces. Height 11 cm. Base 9.3 x 7.4 cm. London 1807. Maker probably James Turner.

  • 1817

    James Scott

    10190 George III Antique Silver Chambersticks

    £4,750

    A fabulous pair of antique Irish silver chambersticks of particularly large size and heavy gauge silver. Plain classic Georgian style with broad gadroon borders, detachable nozzle and snuffer, and attractive shell thumbpiece with a stag crest. Total weight 1211 grams, 38.9 troy ounces. Height 12cm. Diameter 17cm. Spread 18.5cm. Dublin, Ireland 1817. Maker James Scott. Sterling silver. 19th century.

  • 1830

     

    9430 Antique Italian Silver Oil Lamp

    Sold

    An attractive antique silver lamp mounted on a gilt metal cherub column. The traditional style oil lamp has provision for 3 wicks and the cover has a bayonet fitting. Suspended on 3 long chains are the snuffer, knife and tweezer tools. Weighted base. Height 34cm. Diameter of base 11cm. Italian silver marks for Rome and makers mark for Filippo Pacetti circa 1830.

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