waxantiques

Tea / Coffee

English tea drinking traditions are famous worldwide and date back to the 17th century when tea, coffee and chocolate were introduced into this country. The fine array of antique silver pots and associated tea and coffee wares makes a fascinating collecting field, very decorative and enjoyable to use. Browse our collection of antique silver tea, coffee and chocolate related products.
Teapots, Coffee & Chocolate Pots, Tea and Coffee Sets, Kettles & Samovars
Sugar Containers, Tea Caddies, Jugs & Cow Creamers, Tea Accessories

Tea originated in China as a medicinal drink over 2,000 years ago and was introduced into Europe during the 16th century by Portuguese priests and merchants. Drinking tea became fashionable in England during the 17th century and in time led to the English starting large-scale production and commercialization of the plant in India.

Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula and by the 15th century coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. By the 17th century, coffee had made its way to Europe and was becoming popular across the continent. Coffee houses were quickly becoming centres of social activity and communication in the major European cities and in England “penny universities” sprang up, so called because for the price of a penny one could purchase a cup of coffee and engage in stimulating conversation.

At home, the English drank tea rather than coffee. 19th century inventories show that families owned twice as many teawares as coffee utensils. Women adopted the drink for their social gatherings and served tea after dinner. It was also an occasion to demonstrate wealth and good taste, and teawares were as responsive to changing fashion as dress and interior decoration.

read more

Tea / Coffee

English tea drinking traditions are famous worldwide and date back to the 17th century when tea, coffee and chocolate were introduced into this country. The fine array of antique silver pots and associated tea and coffee wares makes a fascinating collecting field, very decorative and enjoyable to use. Browse our collection of antique silver tea, coffee and chocolate related products.
Teapots, Coffee & Chocolate Pots, Tea and Coffee Sets, Kettles & Samovars
Sugar Containers, Tea Caddies, Jugs & Cow Creamers, Tea Accessories

Tea originated in China as a medicinal drink over 2,000 years ago and was introduced into Europe during the 16th century by Portuguese priests and merchants. Drinking tea became fashionable in England during the 17th century and in time led to the English starting large-scale production and commercialization of the plant in India.

Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula and by the 15th century coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. By the 17th century, coffee had made its way to Europe and was becoming popular across the continent. Coffee houses were quickly becoming centres of social activity and communication in the major European cities and in England “penny universities” sprang up, so called because for the price of a penny one could purchase a cup of coffee and engage in stimulating conversation.

At home, the English drank tea rather than coffee. 19th century inventories show that families owned twice as many teawares as coffee utensils. Women adopted the drink for their social gatherings and served tea after dinner. It was also an occasion to demonstrate wealth and good taste, and teawares were as responsive to changing fashion as dress and interior decoration.

  • 1675 - 1679

    Marx Schaller

    9789 Antique German Silver Tea Cannister

    £6,500

    A 17th century German parcel-gilt silver caddy of barrel shape. With a screw top lid and drop ring handle. Beautifully made and very tactile to hold. Suitable for tea and sugar. Raised on four ball feet, the box is decorated throughout with silver lobes against a matted gilt background. Weight 321 grams, 10.3 troy ounces. Height 11.5cm (to the top), 15cm (to top of handle). Stamped on the top and underside of body with German silver marks and assay scrape for Augsburg, Germany. Maker Marx Schaller II. Circa 1675-79. See Rosenburg German silver marks for Augsburg page 127.

  • 1696

    St John Hoyte

    9964 William III Antique Silver Caster

    £2,950

    A late 17th century antique sterling silver muffineer in the traditional lighthouse design with a bayonet fitting, so typical of these very early casters. Excellent size and heavy quality, it feels good in the hand. Lovely patina. The base is plain styled with a gadrooned base, the top is simply pierced, the holes are quite large as crushed loaf sugar was still in use at this early date. Uninscribed.Weight 304 grams, 9.7 troy ounces. Height 19.5cm. Diameter of base 6.3cm. London 1686. Makers mark for St John Hoyte. Sterling silver

  • 1697

     

    9990 William III Antique Silver Cup

    £4,750

    A very unusual antique sterling silver cup of tapering form on a small applied foot; the simple “S” scroll handle having a beaded rat-tail decoration. The body has four panels of hand applied matting work. Originally this would have been either a small mug or toddy cup for alcoholic beverages or possibly a cup for drinking tea or chocolate. Contains 155ml. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Height 7.7cm. Diameter of top 7.2cm. Spread across the handle 9cm. London 1697. Maker unknown.

  • 1711

    Anthony Nelme

    9981 Queen Anne Antique Silver Coffee Pot

    Sold

    A rare early English antique silver coffee pot of straight tapering form with a domed lid typical of the period. Britannia standard silver*. Side handle. Large size and good weight. Nice plain style with contemporary strapwork mounts and ornate thumb piece. Particularly attractive is the decorative silver mount to the wooden handle and the little hinged flap on the end of the spout. Contains 850 ml. Weight 753 grams, 24.2 troy ounces. Height 25cm. Diameter 6.5cm (top), 10.3cm (base). London 1711. Maker Anthony Nelme.

  • 1713

    Anthony Nelme

    9747 Queen Anne Silver Hot Milk Jug

    Sold

    An extremely rare little antique silver milk jug of octagonal baluster form with a hinged lid and serpentine curved lip. Britannia standard silver. Very heavy gauge silver. Excellent patina. Hand engraved to the front is a lion rampant crest within a contemporary decorative cartouche. This is one of the earliest forms of milk jug and the style is very much like a contemporary coffee pot. Weight 386 grams, 12.4 troy ounces. Scratch weight ‘12.2.0’. Height 15.5cm. Spread 12.5cm. Diameter of base 5.8cm. London 1713. Maker Anthony Nelme.

  • 1715

     

    9751 Antique George I Silver Coffee Pot

    £6,500

    An early antique silver coffee pot (or chocolate pot) with domed lid and wooden side handle. Dates from the first year of George I’s reign. Britannia standard* silver. Elegant plain style with simple reed borders and the straight lined octagonal shape is a very rare and desirable feature. The decorative strapwork handle supports are also functional as Britannia standard silver is purer and therefore a softer silver. To the front is a stylised monogram in old fashioned script (later engraved). Weight 669 grams, 21.5 troy ounces. Height 24.5 cm. Diameter of base 10.6cm. London 1715. Maker indistinct.

  • 1715

    Francis Plymley

    9871 George I Silver Teapot

    £4,950

    A fine antique silver bullet shape teapot. Britannia standard silver. Lovely plain, globular form, with a straight spout and wooden handle. Very small size. This is a very early teapot. To the front is a hand engraved crest. A charming feature is the shaped little swivel nut seen below the lid finial. Contains 400 ml, 14 fluid ounces which is about 2 cups. Weight 224 grams, 7.2 troy ounces. Height 11cm. Spread 19.5cm. Diameter of base 6.4cm. London 1715. Maker Francis Plymley.

  • 1718

    John Chartier

    9291 George I Octagonal Silver Caster

    £2,950

    Goliath size. This is a large and very heavy antique silver castor or muffineer in the desirable octagonal shape. Britannia standard silver* 95.8 grade. Bayonet fitting. The top has panels of pierced decoration. Uninscribed. Weight 432 grams, 13.8 troy ounces. Height 21 cm. London 1718. Maker John (Jean) Chartier.

  • 1719

    Richard Bayley

    9137 George I Silver Teapot

    £7,350

    A rare early English silver teapot of simple plain form. Britannia standard silver*. Pear shaped with domed hinged cover and original wooden handle. Hand engraved to the front is a coat of arms – argent, six Lions rampant, sable – within an incised shield, possibly for the Savage family. Early teapots were of small capacity because of the rarity of tea. Contains 570 ml. Weight 425 grams, 13.6 troy ounces. Height 14 cm. Spread 19 cm. London 1719. Maker Richard Bayley.

  • Circa 1720

    Paul de Lamerie

    9720 George I Silver Tea Kettle

    Sold

    A large and imposing antique silver samovar of plain design having a wooden swing handle and 12-sided baluster design. By the sought after Huguenot silversmith Paul de Lamerie. Britannia standard silver*. Very heavy gauge silver. The matching burner stand has carrying handles and stands on large wooden ball feet; it has a removable burner well with push on top and flip cap for the wick. Excellent colour and hand hammered finish. A nice feature is the hinged cover to the pouring spout. Engraved with a crest and name “Riversdale W.G”. Weight 3696 grams, 118.8 troy ounces. Total height 44cm (handle extended). London circa 1720. Maker’s mark stamped 4 times for Paul de Lamerie (Britannia mark).

  • 1722

    John Albright

    9942 George I Antique Silver Strainer

    £1,650

    A rare early English antique sterling silver strainer of circular form with decorative side handles. A very charming and useful size; although originally made as a lemon strainer this could be used nowadays as a tea strainer. The bowl is pierced with a design of scrolls and other motifs and contemporary owner’s initials are engraved to one handle. Weight 75 grams, 2.4 troy oz. Spread 16.8cm. Diameter 8.5cm. Height 2.9cm. London 1722. Maker John Albright. Sterling silver

  • 1723

    Gabriel Sleath

    8550 George I Silver Bullet Teapot

    £4,950

    A fine antique sterling silver bullet shape teapot. Lovely plain shape with a straight spout and very small size. This is a very early teapot. Although a few 17th century teapots exist there is very little likelihood of finding one before 1710. The earlier the teapot the smaller they tend to be as tea was a very expensive commodity. Contains 400 ml, 14 fluid ounces which is about 2 cups. Weight 298 grams, 9.5 troy ounces. Height 11.5 cms. Spread 18.5 cms. London 1723. Maker Gabriel Sleath.

  • 1723

    Edward Gibbons

    9133 George I Silver Tea Caddies with Sliding Tops

    Sold

    A rare pair of antique sterling silver tea caddy boxes with sliding lids. The removable cap doubles up as a tea measure. Lovely plain hexagonal design and good gauge silver. Each sliding top caddy has a decorative cartouche hand engraved to the front. Total weight 390 grams, 12.5 troy ounces. Height 12 cms. Base 9 x 6 cms. London 1723. Maker Edward Gibbons.

  • 1724

    Thomas Tearle

    9999 George I Antique Silver Chocolate Pot

    Sold

    An early English antique sterling silver chocolate pot with straight tapering sides and domed lid typical of the period. Shaped wooden handle and square shaped spout. The top has a removable central cover so that the chocolate can be stirred. Excellent colour. Hand engraved to the front is a well-executed family armorial within a decorative cartouche. Weight 890 grams, 28.6 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Diameter of foot 12cm. London 1724. Maker Thomas Tearle. Sterling silver.

  • 1725

    John Bache

    9729 George I Silver Teapot

    Sold

    A fine early English silver teapot of simple plain form. Pear shaped with domed hinged cover and original wooden handle. Good gauge silver. Hand engraved to the front is large contemporary armorial within a decorative cartouche. Scratchweight 15=3 and owners initials underneath. Early teapots were of small capacity because of the rarity of tea. Contains 600 ml. Weight (including handle) 495 grams, 15.9 troy ounces. Height 21cm. Spread 19.5cm. London 1725. Maker John Bache. Sterling silver.

  • 1726

    William Darker

    8488 Antique George I Octagonal Silver Sugar Bowl

    £3,950

    A rare early English silver sugar bowl of octagonal form. Lovely plain style and heavy gauge silver. Good colour. Weight 132 grams, 4.2 troy ounces. Height 5.5 cms. Diameter 10 cms. London 1726. Maker William Darker.

  • 1726

     

    9411 George I Silver Cream Jug

    Sold

    A pretty little early antique silver sparrow beak jug with a compact body and wire rimmed foot. Good plain style and nice weight. Excellent colour. Contains 95 ml. Weight 67 grams, 2.1 troy ounces. Height 7.75cm. Spread 7.5cm across the top. Sterling silver. London 1726. Maker William Atkinson.

  • 1728

    Thomas Farren

    9984 George II Antique Silver Teapot

    Sold

    A rare antique sterling silver teapot of octagonal, spherical form. A very early teapot. The panelled shape is extremely unusual. Charming small size and hand engraved to the top with a fine quality decoration. Excellent colour and weight. Weight 512 grams, 16.4 troy ounces. Height 10.9cm (to top of handle). Spread 22cm. London 1728. Maker Thomas Farren, a highly desirable maker.

  • 1729

    Humphrey Payne

    9450 George II Silver Cream Jug

    £850

    An early antique silver sparrow beak jug with a compact body and wire rimmed foot. Good plain style and colour. Contains 180 ml. Weight 89 grams, 2.9 troy ounces. Height 9.6cm. Spread 8.5cm across the top. Sterling silver. London 1729. Maker Humphrey Payne.

  • 1732

    Edward Pocock

    9807 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,950

    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides and domed lid. To the front is an excellent contemporary hand engraved armorial within a decorative cartouche. The underside is inscribed with previous owner’s initials. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 650 ml. Weight 594 grams, 19 troy ounces. Height 20cm. Spread 19cm. London 1732. Maker Edward Pocock. Sterling silver.

  • 1732

    George Bulman

    9992 George II Newcastle Silver Teapot

    Sold

    Provincial silver. A fine antique sterling silver bullet shape teapot. Plain, graceful form with a quality inset hinge and curved wooden handle. Small size. Early teapots tend to be small size as tea was a very expensive commodity. Contains 450 ml. Weight 450 grams, 14.4 troy ounces. Height 11.4cm. Spread 21.1cm. Height (top of finial) 11.4cm.  London 1732. Maker George Bulman.

  • 1732

    Paul Crespin

    10103 Set of George II Antique Silver Casters

    Sold

    A fantastic quality set of antique sterling silver castors made by the master silversmith Paul Crespin. Classic plain style with pierced removable tops. Extremely large size, thick gauge and heavy in the hand. An unusual feature is that one small caster has been fitted with a plain inner sleeve, this is known as a “blind caster”, the earliest form of mustard pot. Height 21.5cm and 16.6cm. Weight 1056 grams, 33.9 troy ounces. London 1732 (large), 1733 (small). Maker Paul Crespin.

  • 1733

    Robert Lucas

    9753 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,950

    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides and a shallow domed lid. To the front is a contemporary hand engraved armorial within a decorative cartouche. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 640 ml. Weight 699 grams, 22.4 troy ounces. Height 20cm. Spread 19cm. London 1733. Maker Robert Lucas. Sterling silver.

  • 1733

    Francis Spilsbury

    9861 George II Silver Caster

    £575

    A charming antique silver caster of plain baluster form with a pierced pull off cover. Good colour. Weight 179 grams, 5.7 troy ounces. Height 23 cm. To the front is a hand engraved crest of a crown with a little bird. London 1733. Made by Francis Spilsbury. Sterling silver.

  • 1734

    John Richardson

    9878 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    Sold

    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides, a shallow domed lid, and a shaped ivory handle. Uninscribed. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 1050 ml. Weight 917 grams, 29.4 troy ounces. Height 23cm. Spread 21cm. Diameter of base 11.7cm. London 1734. Makers mark “R.I”, mark not in register, possibly John Richardson I. Sterling silver.

  • 1735

    Esaius Busch III

    9293 Antique German Silver Teapot

    £4,750

    An antique sterling silver teapot of pear shape form with ribbing. Small size. The curved spout with a hinged cover, the lid is side hinged. Both lid and body have panels of hand chased decoration and there are applied putti medallions to the front and rear. Contains 780 ml. Weight 409 grams, 13.1 troy ounces. Height 14.5 cm. Spread 20 cm. Stamped underneath with German silver marks for Augsburg 1735/6. Maker Esaius Busch III.

  • 1735

     

    9538 George II Silver Jug

    £675

    An antique sterling silver sparrow beak jug with a compact body and wire rimmed foot. Good plain style. Good patina. Weight 81 grams, 2.6 troy ounces. Height 7.5cm. Spread 7.3cm across the top. Sterling silver. London 1735. Maker’s mark not fully stamped.

  • 1738

    John Jacob

    9977 George II Antique Silver Kettle

    Sold

    A handsome antique sterling silver samovar of globular form having a shaped folding handle with leather finish. Hand engraved to the front is a large armorial within a decorative cartouche there is a matching crest on the reservoir lid and well. The matching stand has a cut-work frieze and stands on large shell feet, it has a removable burner well with push on top. Contains 1550 ml. Weight 1695 grams, 54.5 troy ounces. Total height (handle extended) 31.5cm, height (handle folded) 23.5cm. Spread 22.5cm. London 1738. Maker John Jacob. Sterling silver.

  • 1740

    Paul de Lamerie

    9690 George II Cream Boat by Paul de Lamerie

    Sold

    A superb antique silver cream jug made by the celebrated 18th century Huguenot silversmith Paul de Lamerie. A fine piece of exuberant rococo silver of naturalistic design incorporating boldly cast figural images, foliage, fruit and flowers. Very heavy and sits well in the hand. The shaped oval body stands on 3 shell feet with curious face masks and scrolling leaf terminals. The handle is formed as 2 intertwined snakes and attached to the body by a large flower rosette. Below the pouring lip is another face mask and the crest of an arm and sword. Both sides have a large applied decorative panel on a matted background. Weight 212 grams, 6.8 troy ounces. Height 9.4cm (to top of handle). Spread 12.4cm. Width 7cm. London 1740. Maker Paul de Lamerie.

  • 1748

    Samuel Taylor

    9867 George II Covered Sugar Bowl

    £1,750

    A rare antique sterling silver covered sugar bowl of circular form on a small spreading foot. Excellent plain design, typical of the period. Good colour. In the early 18th century sugar bowls or sugar boxes nearly always had covers which, when reversed, could be used as a saucer or spoon tray. Weight 219 grams, 7.0 troy ounces. Total height 9cm. Bowl diameter 9.7cm. London 1748. Maker probably Samuel Taylor a specialist tea caddy and sugar bowl maker.

  • Circa 1749

    David Hennell

    8976 George II Antique Silver Teapot

    £2,250

    An early English sterling silver teapot of globular form. Early teapots were of small capacity because of the rarity of tea. Lovely plain shape with a straight spout and engraved decoration to the upper body. An attractive feature is the blobby mercury solder underneath which is completely original in the manufacture. Generally speaking bullet teapots were only made during the George II period. Weight 372 grams, 11.9 troy ounces. Height 12.5 cms (to top of handle). Spread 20.5 cms. London 1749. Maker David Hennell I.

  • Circa 1750

     

    8264 George II Silver Cream Jug

    £785

    An excellent little early antique silver sparrow beak jug with a tall slim body and pedestal foot. Sterling silver. Good plain style and excellent colour. With a hand engraved crest to the front. Small size silver cream jugs without lids were only introduced in the 1720’s. Weight 72 grams, 2.3 troy ounces. Height 8 cm. Spread 7 cm across the top. Diameter of top 3.5 cm. English silver hallmarks for London, no date letter – circa 1750. Makers mark possibly “P.P”.

Keep up to date with our Latest Items and News on Early Silver

    Instagram