waxantiques

Salts

Antique Silver Salt Cellars are not commonly found until the 1700’s although the use of Salt Cellars is documented as early as classical Rome. During medieval times elaborate master salt cellars evolved which had not only a practical use but above all, a ceremonial importance, indicating the relative status of persons by their position at the table in relation to the large salt.

By 1600 the Trencher Salt was in use in England however these earliest examples are extremely rare and probably you won’t find a pair of trencher salts before 1690. These salts had no feet and were made in a wide range of shapes: round, oval rectangular, triangular or octagonal. The early trencher salts were often marked inside the bowl and are often badly worn through use and cleaning.

During the late 1730s the more traditional circular salt standing on 3 legs had mainly replaced the trencher salt. This shape remained popular until the late 18th century when the advent of the Industrial Revolution rendered both salt and salt cellars commonplace. From this time onwards silver salts were produced in a variety of forms, some with blue glass liners, and these become commonplace on the English dining table.

Salt Shakers began to appear in the Victorian era, however there were problems with salt clumping. It was not until after 1911, when anti-caking agents began to be added to table salt, that salt shakers gained favour and open salts began to fall into disuse.

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Salts

Antique Silver Salt Cellars are not commonly found until the 1700’s although the use of Salt Cellars is documented as early as classical Rome. During medieval times elaborate master salt cellars evolved which had not only a practical use but above all, a ceremonial importance, indicating the relative status of persons by their position at the table in relation to the large salt.

By 1600 the Trencher Salt was in use in England however these earliest examples are extremely rare and probably you won’t find a pair of trencher salts before 1690. These salts had no feet and were made in a wide range of shapes: round, oval rectangular, triangular or octagonal. The early trencher salts were often marked inside the bowl and are often badly worn through use and cleaning.

During the late 1730s the more traditional circular salt standing on 3 legs had mainly replaced the trencher salt. This shape remained popular until the late 18th century when the advent of the Industrial Revolution rendered both salt and salt cellars commonplace. From this time onwards silver salts were produced in a variety of forms, some with blue glass liners, and these become commonplace on the English dining table.

Salt Shakers began to appear in the Victorian era, however there were problems with salt clumping. It was not until after 1911, when anti-caking agents began to be added to table salt, that salt shakers gained favour and open salts began to fall into disuse.

  • Circa 1698

     

    9935 17th Century Silver Capstan Trencher Salt

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    A rare antique Dutch silver salt cellar, late 17th century, of square base form with canted corners. The waisted stem is beautifully engraved and chased with scroll and scalework detail, with the engraved date ‘1698’ above and initials ‘I T’. The base and circular bowl have the embossed fluting typical of the circa 1700 period. Weight 111 grams,3.5 troy ounces. Height 6.3cm. Width of base 9cm. Probably Dutch. Makers mark “HS”. Circa 1698.

  • 1732

    Paul de Lamerie

    10181 George II Antique Silver Salts

    £4,750

    A handsome set of 4 antique silver salts by the sought after Huguenot silversmith. Plain, compact form and a lovely chunky feel. Heavy gauge metal. Total weight 440 grams, 14.1 troy ounces. Height 4.3cm. Diameter 6cm. London 1732. Maker Paul de Lamerie. Sterling silver.

  • 1780

    Thomas Harper

    8620 Antique Silver Trencher Salts

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    A handsome set of four antique sterling silver trencher salts in the rectangular form popular at the start of the 18th century but actually dating to 1780. Good size. Traces of the original gilt interior. Total weight 220 grams, 7 troy ounces. Base 7.5 x 6 cms. Top 6 x 4.5 cms. London 1780. Maker Thomas Harper. Sterling silver.

  • 1793

    Edward Lowe

    9976 George III Antique Silver Salts

    £850

    An elegant set of 4 of antique sterling silver salt cellars of oval form with pretty pierced decoration with swags. Blue glass liners. Lovely classical style with rope borders and standing on pierced shaped feet. Weight of silver 218 grams, 7 troy ounces. Height 5cm. Top measures 8.3 x 6.1cm. London 1793. Maker Edward Lowe.

  • 1830

    Paul Storr

    9083 Antique Silver Salt Cellars by Paul Storr

    £4,950

    A trio of superb quality silver salts by the world famous English silversmith Paul Storr. Excellent quality and good gauge silver as you’d expect from this sought after maker. Each rococo sea shell is supported on three conch shell feet and has the original gilt interior.To the front of each is a hand engraved crest. Total weight 393 grams, 12.6 troy ounces. Height 5cm. Top measures 10x9cm. London 1830. Maker Paul Storr. Sterling silver.

  • 1858 - 1900

    George Unite

    9361 Antique Silver Novelty Salts

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    A delightful set of three antique silver condiments, each in the form of a knight’s helmet. The visor moves up and down to open and close the salt pot. Gilded interiors. Total silver weight 195 grams, 6.2 troy ounces. One salt London 1858, height 6.4cm, diameter 5.1 cm. Two salts London 1900, height 6.6cm, diameter 5.2cm. All made by George Unite.

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