waxantiques

Coffee & Chocolate

Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula and by the 15th century coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. By the 17th century, coffee had made its way to Europe and was becoming popular across the continent. Coffee houses were quickly becoming centres of social activity and communication in the major European cities and in England “penny universities” sprang up, so called because for the price of a penny one could purchase a cup of coffee and engage in stimulating conversation.

Coffee began to replace the common breakfast drink beverages of the time — beer and wine. Those who drank coffee instead of alcohol began the day alert and energized, and not surprisingly, the quality of their work was greatly improved. (We like to think of this a precursor to the modern office coffee service). By the mid-17th century, there were over 300 coffee houses in London, many of which attracted like-minded patrons, including merchants, shippers, brokers and artists. Many businesses grew out of these specialized coffee houses. Lloyd’s of London, for example, came into existence at the Edward Lloyd’s Coffee House.

Coffee and chocolate were established as part of social life by the end of the century and coffee pots can be found from the 1680’s onwards. Initially, these tall form pots (as averse to the squatter teapot shape) were used for both coffee and chocolate however we term chocolate pots to be those with either a removable finial or removable lid for inserting a swizzle stick. We also nominate some early side handled pots as chocolate pots.

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Coffee & Chocolate

Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula and by the 15th century coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. By the 17th century, coffee had made its way to Europe and was becoming popular across the continent. Coffee houses were quickly becoming centres of social activity and communication in the major European cities and in England “penny universities” sprang up, so called because for the price of a penny one could purchase a cup of coffee and engage in stimulating conversation.

Coffee began to replace the common breakfast drink beverages of the time — beer and wine. Those who drank coffee instead of alcohol began the day alert and energized, and not surprisingly, the quality of their work was greatly improved. (We like to think of this a precursor to the modern office coffee service). By the mid-17th century, there were over 300 coffee houses in London, many of which attracted like-minded patrons, including merchants, shippers, brokers and artists. Many businesses grew out of these specialized coffee houses. Lloyd’s of London, for example, came into existence at the Edward Lloyd’s Coffee House.

Coffee and chocolate were established as part of social life by the end of the century and coffee pots can be found from the 1680’s onwards. Initially, these tall form pots (as averse to the squatter teapot shape) were used for both coffee and chocolate however we term chocolate pots to be those with either a removable finial or removable lid for inserting a swizzle stick. We also nominate some early side handled pots as chocolate pots.

  • 1715

     

    9751 Antique George I Silver Coffee Pot

    £6,500

    An early antique silver coffee pot (or chocolate pot) with domed lid and wooden side handle. Dates from the first year of George I’s reign. Britannia standard* silver. Elegant plain style with simple reed borders and the straight lined octagonal shape is a very rare and desirable feature. The decorative strapwork handle supports are also functional as Britannia standard silver is purer and therefore a softer silver. To the front is a stylised monogram in old fashioned script (later engraved). Weight 669 grams, 21.5 troy ounces. Height 24.5 cm. Diameter of base 10.6cm. London 1715. Maker indistinct.

  • 1715

    Martin Stockar

    10165 Antique George I Silver Coffee Pot

    £10,750

    An early antique silver coffee pot (or chocolate pot) with domed lid and beautifully grained fruit wood side handle. The elegant plain style, with simple reed borders, has the straight lined octagonal shape which is a very rare and desirable feature. The decorative strapwork handle supports are also functional as Britannia standard silver is purer and therefore a softer silver. Contains 1000ml. Weight 1098 grams, 35.3 troy ounces. Height 26.6cm. Diameter 15.25cm (widest point of body). London 1715. Maker Martin Stockar. Britannia standard silver.

  • 1724

    Thomas Tearle

    9999 George I Antique Silver Chocolate Pot

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    An early English antique sterling silver chocolate pot with straight tapering sides and domed lid typical of the period. Shaped wooden handle and square shaped spout. The top has a removable central cover so that the chocolate can be stirred. Excellent colour. Hand engraved to the front is a well-executed family armorial within a decorative cartouche. Weight 890 grams, 28.6 troy ounces. Height 22cm. Diameter of foot 12cm. London 1724. Maker Thomas Tearle. Sterling silver.

  • 1732

    Edward Pocock

    9807 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,950

    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides and domed lid. To the front is an excellent contemporary hand engraved armorial within a decorative cartouche. The underside is inscribed with previous owner’s initials. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 650 ml. Weight 594 grams, 19 troy ounces. Height 20cm. Spread 19cm. London 1732. Maker Edward Pocock. Sterling silver.

  • 1733

    Robert Lucas

    9753 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,950

    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides and a shallow domed lid. To the front is a contemporary hand engraved armorial within a decorative cartouche. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 640 ml. Weight 699 grams, 22.4 troy ounces. Height 20cm. Spread 19cm. London 1733. Maker Robert Lucas. Sterling silver.

  • 1734

    John Richardson

    9878 George II Silver Coffee Pot

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    A good plain style antique silver coffee pot with straight tapering sides, a shallow domed lid, and a shaped ivory handle. Uninscribed. Good gauge silver and excellent colour. Contains 1050 ml. Weight 917 grams, 29.4 troy ounces. Height 23cm. Spread 21cm. Diameter of base 11.7cm. London 1734. Makers mark “R.I”, mark not in register, possibly John Richardson I. Sterling silver.

  • 1752

    John Swift

    9969 George II Antique Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,650

    An antique sterling silver coffee pot with a straight sided, slightly baluster form raised on a shallow pedestal foot. Good quality shaped wooden handle. Elegant plain design and graceful shaped spout. Contains 980 ml. Weight 776 grams, 24.9 troy ounces. Height 24cm. Spread across spout and handle 21cm. London 1752. Maker John Swift.

  • 1754

    James Williams

    9847 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £2,650

    This excellent pot, of graceful form, is also extremely large and heavy. A handsome antique silver coffee pot of baluster form raised on a shallow pedestal foot. Elegant plain design and graceful shaped spout. To the front there is a hand engraved lion crest within a large decorative cartouche, to the reverse there’s a dog crest. Contains 1650 ml. Weight 1313 grams, 53 troy ounces. Height 30.2cm. Spread across spout and handle 26.3cm. London 1754. Maker James Williams. Sterling silver.

  • 1759

    Benjamin Gignac

    9717 George II Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,250

    An antique sterling silver coffee pot of plain baluster shape and raised on a pedestal foot. Good chunky gadroon borders and graceful shaped spout. Uninscribed. Contains 1200 ml. Weight 950 grams, 30.5 troy ounces. Height 28.8 cm. Spread across spout and handle 21.5 cm. London 1759. Maker Benjamin Gignac. Sterling silver.

  • 1775

    James Young

    9837 George III Silver Coffee Pot

    £1,350

    An excellent quality antique silver coffee pot with plain baluster shape and bead borders. Graceful shaped spout and carved wooden handle. This pot is beautifully hand chased with flowers and foliate scrolls, the quality of the workmanship is further evident from the inside. Engraved to the front with a crest and motto. Weight 944 grams, 30.3 troy ounces. Contains 1100 ml. Height 30.5 cm. Spread across spout and handle 2 cm. London 1775. Maker James Young. Sterling silver.

  • 1779

    Robert Hennell I

    9760 George III Antique Silver Jug

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    A handsome antique sterling silver beer jug (or water jug) of baluster shape with a hinged cover and bead borders. Excellent heavy gauge and patina. Contains 686 ml. Weight 679 grams, 22 troy ounces. Height 22.5cm (to top of finial). Spread 15cm. London 1779. Maker Robert Hennell I.

  • Circa 1800

     

    5487 Antique French Silver Chocolate Pot with Side Handle

    £1,450

    An attractive antique French silver chocolate or coffee pot with plain styling. The turned wood side handle can be unscrewed. Contains 1050 ml. Weight 764 grams, 24.5 troy ounces. Height 25.5 cms. Fully marked with French silver stamps to the lid and body for Paris circa 1800. Silver grade 950. makers initials JFC

  • 1818

    Edward Farrell

    9916 Regency Silver Coffee Pot

    £8,750

    An outstanding quality antique silver coffee pot of gourd form, the body depicting Dutch tavern scenes after David Teniers, deeply chased in relief. Made by Edward Farrell, one of the most innovative silversmiths of the day. The fabulous spout, in the form of a dragon with outstretched wings, is very rare and unrecorded. The drunken revellers are drinking, playing music and dancing in the company of serving wenches, dogs and a caged bird. The lid finial depicts a man reclining with his dog, drinking and smoking a long pipe. This very heavy pot weighs 1394 grams, 44.8 troy ounces. Height 25.5cm. Spread 22.5cm. London 1818. Maker Edward Farrell.

  • Circa 1820

     

    10128 Dutch Antique Silver Miniature Coffee Pot

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    A lovely little antique silver toy coffee pot with a pull off lid and shaped wooden handle. It looks like an exact copy of a full size original. Height 7.5cm. Probably made in the Netherlands. Circa 1820. Unmarked silver.

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