waxantiques

Cup / Goblet / Porringer

Drinking plays an important role in the enjoyment of life. Browse our collection of sterling silver cups, goblets, beakers, porringers and specialist drinking vessels. An excellent range of early silver examples for the collector which are ideal for practical use and make a perfect gift.

Cups and Trophies, Goblets & Chalices, Beakers & Tumbler Cups
Coconut Cups and Quaiches, Porringers and Bleeding Bowls, Stirrup and Wager Cups

Silver Cups and Trophies. Large size goblets and 2 handled cups are often given as trophy prizes and many have interesting presentation inscriptions. These cups are often used as wine coolers and make fascinating conversation pieces.

Silver Wine Goblets were popular in England during the 17th century until they were superseded by glass drinking vessels in the late 1600s. Silver goblets made a comeback in the mid 18th century and have remained popular ever since. Church communion Chalices can be found dating back to as early as 1560. They sometimes have a cover which doubles as a paten.

Antique Silver Beakers date back to the early 1600s in Europe. They have remained popular up until the present day and are generally of a simple flared form. Sometimes double beakers are found which fit together in the shape of a barrel.
The “Camp Canteen”, dating from the late 17th century onwards, is a travelling set consisting of a beaker fitted inside with cutlery, condiments and possibly a corkscrew.

Silver Tumbler Cups were made from the mid 17th century onwards. They are made from thick gauge sheet silver which was hammered up so that the sides become thinner towards the top and the rounded base would have the greater weight. When they are knocked over they will automatically right themselves. A very useful drinking cup to use onboard ship.

Antique Silver Mounted Coconut Cups. Coconuts were prized in early times for their healing powers and drinking vessels were often formed from them. The coconut cup is a variety of standing cup, made and used in Europe in the 15th and 16th Century, with a revival in Georgian England. Usually they have a pedestal foot or 3 ornamental feet and are mounted in silver or Old Sheffield plate. Many coconuts were carved on board ship by the sailors (or prisoners of war).

Silver Quaiches. Used in Scotland for centuries, the quaiche is a shallow cup with two, or even three, side handles used to drink spirits such as whiskey or brandy. It is a social drinking vessel, symbolic of friendship and trust, which one person would pass to another with both hands (which would render them incapable of holding a secret weapon). In the centre of the basin usually lies a large coin or medallion, often engraved with a coat of arms, a set of initials, a motto, or a toast such as ‘cheers!’ Over the years the quaiche has become a traditional gift at special occasions such as weddings and christenings.

Porringers and Bleeding Bowls. In the past, people from all levels of society took their food in forms unfamiliar today. Everyday nourishment depended heavily on eggs, milk, oats and grains. Ale, sack mead, wine, spices, sultanas and sugar were added for flavor. The gruel, porridge, potage (soup), caudle and other sloppy warm mixtures were partially drunk and partially eaten with a spoon. They were served in 2 handled cups, often with a cover to keep it warm.

Silver Porringers are two handled bowls and some have a cover. They can also be known as caudle cups although the origin of the porringer was for porridge and the caudle cup was for a type of broth. From the eighteenth century onwards, porringers and cups and covers were used mainly as centrepieces or ornaments. In recent times they have seen a resurgence in popularity for drinking and on the dining table. They make a very attractive baby gift.

Silver Bleeding Bowls may have been used for medical purposes however many people think that these shallow bowls were more likely to have been eating vessels, especially for feeding the sick.

Figural Cups, Stirrup Cups and Wager Cups

Silver Stirrup Cups in silver didn’t become popular until the mid 18th century. The name derives from a cup of wine or other alcoholic drink offered to a person on horseback who is about to depart on a journey (with one’s feet in the stirrups). This term is now more associated with the cup used at the traditional fox hunt. The stirrup cup is usually ornamental and often in the form of a fox head.

Silver Wager Cups.
Marriage cups. These highly collectible silver double drinking vessels are also known as marriage cups. The idea is to drink the contents of the large cup (the lady’s skirt) without spilling the drink inside the small cup. The bride would drink from the small cup, the groom from the large cup.
Windmill cups were used as a drinking game. First fill the cup up with a liquor of choice and spin the windmill sails (either by hand or by blowing the horn). The challenge is to drink the contents of the cup before the sails stop. The clock hands on some windmills also revolve with the sails and a penalty would be due depending on the number where the hand (pointer) stopped.”

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Cup / Goblet / Porringer

Drinking plays an important role in the enjoyment of life. Browse our collection of sterling silver cups, goblets, beakers, porringers and specialist drinking vessels. An excellent range of early silver examples for the collector which are ideal for practical use and make a perfect gift.

Cups and Trophies, Goblets & Chalices, Beakers & Tumbler Cups
Coconut Cups and Quaiches, Porringers and Bleeding Bowls, Stirrup and Wager Cups

Silver Cups and Trophies. Large size goblets and 2 handled cups are often given as trophy prizes and many have interesting presentation inscriptions. These cups are often used as wine coolers and make fascinating conversation pieces.

Silver Wine Goblets were popular in England during the 17th century until they were superseded by glass drinking vessels in the late 1600s. Silver goblets made a comeback in the mid 18th century and have remained popular ever since. Church communion Chalices can be found dating back to as early as 1560. They sometimes have a cover which doubles as a paten.

Antique Silver Beakers date back to the early 1600s in Europe. They have remained popular up until the present day and are generally of a simple flared form. Sometimes double beakers are found which fit together in the shape of a barrel.
The “Camp Canteen”, dating from the late 17th century onwards, is a travelling set consisting of a beaker fitted inside with cutlery, condiments and possibly a corkscrew.

Silver Tumbler Cups were made from the mid 17th century onwards. They are made from thick gauge sheet silver which was hammered up so that the sides become thinner towards the top and the rounded base would have the greater weight. When they are knocked over they will automatically right themselves. A very useful drinking cup to use onboard ship.

Antique Silver Mounted Coconut Cups. Coconuts were prized in early times for their healing powers and drinking vessels were often formed from them. The coconut cup is a variety of standing cup, made and used in Europe in the 15th and 16th Century, with a revival in Georgian England. Usually they have a pedestal foot or 3 ornamental feet and are mounted in silver or Old Sheffield plate. Many coconuts were carved on board ship by the sailors (or prisoners of war).

Silver Quaiches. Used in Scotland for centuries, the quaiche is a shallow cup with two, or even three, side handles used to drink spirits such as whiskey or brandy. It is a social drinking vessel, symbolic of friendship and trust, which one person would pass to another with both hands (which would render them incapable of holding a secret weapon). In the centre of the basin usually lies a large coin or medallion, often engraved with a coat of arms, a set of initials, a motto, or a toast such as ‘cheers!’ Over the years the quaiche has become a traditional gift at special occasions such as weddings and christenings.

Porringers and Bleeding Bowls. In the past, people from all levels of society took their food in forms unfamiliar today. Everyday nourishment depended heavily on eggs, milk, oats and grains. Ale, sack mead, wine, spices, sultanas and sugar were added for flavor. The gruel, porridge, potage (soup), caudle and other sloppy warm mixtures were partially drunk and partially eaten with a spoon. They were served in 2 handled cups, often with a cover to keep it warm.

Silver Porringers are two handled bowls and some have a cover. They can also be known as caudle cups although the origin of the porringer was for porridge and the caudle cup was for a type of broth. From the eighteenth century onwards, porringers and cups and covers were used mainly as centrepieces or ornaments. In recent times they have seen a resurgence in popularity for drinking and on the dining table. They make a very attractive baby gift.

Silver Bleeding Bowls may have been used for medical purposes however many people think that these shallow bowls were more likely to have been eating vessels, especially for feeding the sick.

Figural Cups, Stirrup Cups and Wager Cups

Silver Stirrup Cups in silver didn’t become popular until the mid 18th century. The name derives from a cup of wine or other alcoholic drink offered to a person on horseback who is about to depart on a journey (with one’s feet in the stirrups). This term is now more associated with the cup used at the traditional fox hunt. The stirrup cup is usually ornamental and often in the form of a fox head.

Silver Wager Cups.
Marriage cups. These highly collectible silver double drinking vessels are also known as marriage cups. The idea is to drink the contents of the large cup (the lady’s skirt) without spilling the drink inside the small cup. The bride would drink from the small cup, the groom from the large cup.
Windmill cups were used as a drinking game. First fill the cup up with a liquor of choice and spin the windmill sails (either by hand or by blowing the horn). The challenge is to drink the contents of the cup before the sails stop. The clock hands on some windmills also revolve with the sails and a penalty would be due depending on the number where the hand (pointer) stopped.”

  • Circa 1574

    Lawrence Stratford

    10321 Elizabeth I Antique Silver Chalice

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    Originating from the English provincial town of Dorchester in Dorset, this fine early English chalice dates to the reign of Elizabeth I. It has the standard design for Elizabethan communion cups with straight tapering sides and a slightly flared top; with wire ornament applied to the stem and hammered egg and dart frieze to the foot. The beautifully hatched decorative bands below the top edge of the cup are typical for the period, they are well executed and with good definition. Most likely this cup has been made from pre-reformation silver and it has the lovely hand beaten finish you’d expect at this date. The removable cover (paten) bears the date of 1574. Superb antique colour.
    Contains 250 ml. Chalice weight 231 grams, 7.4 troy oz. Height 20.2cm, diameter of top 9.9cm. Cover weight 55 grams, 1.7 troy oz. Height 2.4cm, diameter 9cm. London c.1574.
    Maker’s mark only for Lawrence Stratford. Sterling silver. 16th century.

  • 1625

    Robert Profit

    9989 Charles I Antique Silver Bowl

    £5,950

    An extremely early date. A rare antique silver porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form. The straight sided shape with a simple rim is the earliest type and in keeping with the early date. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Prick marked on the edge of the rim with the initials “MC”. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Diameter 10.3cm. Height 3.5 cm. Spread 14cm. London 1625. Maker “RP” possibly Robert Profit (David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”).

  • Circa 1630

    Daniel Gee

    10359 Charles I Antique Silver Wine Cup

    £7,950

    An exquisite little antique silver cup dating from the early 1600’s. It’s very rare to find a small cup from this date and with such fine proportions. The tapering bowl stands on a knopped stem with a spreading circular foot. Contains 85ml. Weight 115g, 3.6 troy oz. Height 11.7cm. London circa 1630. Maker Daniel Gee. Sterling silver.

  • 1631

     

    10256 Charles I Antique Silver Cup

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    A superb early English silver wine cup of very plain form with a cast baluster stem and spreading foot. This large goblet has an excellent patina, good weight, and sits very well in the hand. To the front is a well-executed armorial for Dr Thomas Eden, hand engraved, the style is typical of the Charles I period with the shield within a laurel-wreath. This is an outstanding piece of antique silver in every way. Contains 430 ml. Weight 326 grams, 10.4 troy ounces. Height 19.8cm. Diameter 9.2cm (top), 9cm (foot). London 1631. Maker “HM”. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1635

    Henry Starkey

    10306 Charles I Antique Silver Wine Cup

    £18,500

    A rare English silver wine cup of very plain form on a cast baluster stem and spreading foot. This goblet has a superb patina and is perfectly styled for use in modern day times with its unusual tapering bowl. The original slightly hand beaten finish is visible on the inside. This is a very special piece of antique silver.

  • 1649

    Daniel Gee

    10113 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Cup

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    An important piece of early English antique silver dating back to 1649, the year of King Charles I’s execution. This twin handled silver cup, with shaped side handles and spreading circular foot, is possibly a very early example of a porringer, or caudle cup. The body has a hand chased band of decoration at the top with matted roundels and punched motifs below; this more sombre decoration is associated particularly with the Commonwealth period. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the beaded and segmented decoration to the base, very reminiscent of wine tasters of this period. Hand engraved to the front are the initials “MB” surrounded by stars. Weight 286 grams, 9.1 troy ounces. Height 11.6cm. Spread across handles 16cm. Diameter 11.5cm (top), 8.6cm (base). London 1649. Maker “DG” with an anchor for Daniel Gee (*see David Mitchell’s book on “Silversmiths in Stuart and Elizabethan England”). Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1650

     

    9680 Antique Dutch Silver Beaker

    £4,650

    An antique silver beaker of tapering cylindrical form on a cast, coin inset, foot. Bright gilding inside and out. The body is decorated with 3 figures within oval cartouches surrounded by engraved floral and fruit designs. Contains 270 ml. Weight 230 grams, 7.3 troy ounces. Height 13.5cm. Dutch silver marks, possibly Groningen. Maker’s mark 3 anchors. Circa 1650.

  • 1654

    John Winterton

    10340 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Beaker

    £2,850

    An early English silver drinking cup of small size. Plain tapering design with a turned over lip and simple foot. Contains 240 ml. Weight 63 grams, 2 troy ounces. Height 7cm. Diameter 7.5cm. London 1654. Maker John Winterton. Sterling silver.

  • 1662

    Edward Treen

    10339 Charles II Antique Silver Porringer

    £2,950

    A very early English twin handled silver cup with cast serpent form side handles. This little porringer (or caudle cup) combines some of the austere decoration associated with the Commonwealth period with the addition of hand engraved flowers marking the transition into the joyful Restoration period of Charles II. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the decorative base, very reminiscent of sweetmeat dishes of this period. Contains 250ml. Weight 113 grams, 3.6 troy ounces. Diameter 7.7 cm. Height 7cm (to top of handle). London 1662. Maker Edward Treen, specialist cup, porringer and sweetmeat dish maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1666

    Gowen Udall

    10368 Charles II Antique Silver Porringer

    Reserved

    A magnificent piece of early English silver. A large 2 handled antique silver cup and cover with caryatid handles; the body decorated all round with deep relief flowers and foliage typical of this early date. The hand beaten finish is very appealing. The matching cover has a capstan shaped finial so that the lid can be turned upside down and used on its own as a saucer. The lid finial bears a large hand engraved armorial with a crest and motto; the crest is repeated to the front and reverse of the porringer body. The underside has a large presentation inscription dated 1666. Weight 603g, 19.3 troy oz. Spread across handles 20cm. Height 14.5cm (total), 11.2cm (top of handle), 10.5cm (top of body). Diameter 11.8cm. London 1666. Maker probably Gowen Udall – source David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”. Sterling silver.

  • 1673

     

    8394 Charles II Silver Porringer

    £1,750

    A rare early English silver porringer of small size having 2 side handles and belly shape. Lovely original hand beaten finish. Weight 69 grams, 2.2 troy ounces. Height 5.5 cms. Diameter 6 cms. London 1673. Maker IC* listed in Jacksons.

  • Circa 1674

     

    10260 Antique Augsburg Silver Drinking Tot

    £1,650

    A delightful little antique silver cup with a faded gilt patina; having cast foliate side handles and decorative motifs to the lower body. Original bright gilt interior. Contains 70ml. Weight 70 grams, 2.2 troy ounces. Height 6cm. Diameter 5.5cm. Made in Augsburg, Germany. Circa 1674. 17th century.

  • 1675

    Simon Romney

    8739 Antique Charles II Silver Porringer

    £7,500

    A rare piece of early English silver. A large 2 handled antique silver porringer of plain form. The matching cover has a capstan shaped finial so that the lid can be turned upside down and used on its own as a saucer. This has the form of a typical early Restoration porringer, with bellied shape and the lid sitting over the upper rim. There is a small silver support either side next to the handle for the lid to sit on. Hand engraved to the front, and repeated on the cover, are the arms and crest for the Yong family of Medhurst, Sussex. Weight 375 grams, 12 troy ounces. Height 14 cm (total), 10 cm (cup), 4.5 cm (lid). Diameter 10 cm. Spread across the handles 17 cm. London 1675. Makers mark “SR”* in a shield (there are 2 similar marks in Jacksons, see page 124 and 129, bottom of the page), probably Simon Romney.

  • 1680

    Thomas Cory

    9904 Charles II Silver Bowl

    £2,850

    An early English silver side handled porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form and shallow bellied shape. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets.The handle is prick marked “I*C 1681 M”. Weight 104 grams, 3.3 troy ounces. Diameter 10.4cm. Height 3.6 cm. Spread 15.4cm. London 1680. Maker Thomas Cory. Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1690

    Katherine Mangy

    10186 William and Mary Antique Hull Silver Tumbler Cup

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    A rare item of English provincial silver from Hull in the North of England. An antique silver tumbler cup of simple plain design. Good gauge silver and excellent patina. The round and weighted base allows the cup to stay upright when knocked from side to side. This example, typical of Hull silver tumblers, has a flatter base than those made in London. To the front is a hand engraved armorial with a badger crest for the Brooke family. To the reverse are owner’s initials “AD to IS”.  Contains  170 ml. Weight  116 grams, 3.7 troy ounces. Height 5.4cm. Diameter 7.3cm. Hull circa 1690. Maker Kath Mangy (Jacksons page 473). Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1690

    William Gamble

    10293 William and Mary Antique Silver Beaker

    £2,750

    An early English silver cup with plain tapering sides and rounded base. Contains 350ml. Weight 147 grams, 4.7 troy ounces. Height 9.2cm. Diameter 8.5 (top), 6cm (base). Maker William Gamble. Circa 1690. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1692

    John Richardson

    9890 William and Mary Chinoiserie Silver Beaker

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    An early English antique silver beaker of plain tapering design with simple foot wires. Dating from the late 1600’s. Compact size. Charmingly decorated with a band of hand chased decoration of birds and foliage in the Chinese style known as “chinoiserie”. To the front there is a hand engraved prick dot design containing “F.S” and the date 1693. Excellent patina and hand beaten finish. Contains 160 ml. Weight 74 grams, 2.3 troy ounces. Height 8.1 cm. Diameter 7.2cm. London 1692. Maker John Richardson, a prominent cup and tankard maker known for chinoiserie silver. Sterling silver.

  • 1697

     

    9990 William III Antique Silver Cup

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    A very unusual antique silver chocolate cup of tapering form on a small applied foot; the simple “S” scroll handle having a beaded rat-tail decoration. The body has four panels of hand applied matting work. This rare little cup was made for drinking hot chocolate, the newly discovered drinking beverage popular c.1680-1720 – see the coloured illustration. Contains 155ml. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Height 7.7cm. Diameter of top 7.2cm. Spread across the handle 9cm. London 1697. Maker unknown.

  • 1697

    William Andrews

    10370 William and Mary Antique Silver Beaker

    £4,950

    A rare early English silver drinking cup of tapering cylindrical form with a flared lip, central band and simple reeded foot. Very attractive size. The lower body has the deep embossed band of acanthus leaves, a popular decoration of the period. Hand engraved to the front are owner’s initials with the date 1701. Contains 150ml. Weight 101g, 3.2 troy oz. Height 7.9cm. Diameter 6.8cm. London 1697. Maker William Andrews. Britannia standard silver – high purity 95.8%.

  • 1698

    John Smithsend

    10338 Antique William III Silver Bleeding Bowl

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    An early English silver side handled porringer or bleeding bowl of plain circular form. Britannia standard silver*. Very charming with the shaped pierced handle and original hand beaten finish. Hand engraved to the front is an armorial within plumage feathers, typical of the period, and there is a crest to the handle. Weight 253 grams, 8.1 troy ounces. Diameter 13.5 cm. Height 5.4 cm. Spread 20.5 cm. London 1698. Maker John Smithsend. Britannia standard silver 95.8% pure.

  • 1711

    Simon Pantin

    10350 Queen Anne Antique Silver Cup and Cover

    £15,500

    A magnificent antique silver cup and cover of campana form with twin side handles. Lovely plain style, very good weight and large size. Excellent quality with the cut card banding typical of this sought after Huguenot maker. Engraved to the front is a large marital coat of arms for Bagot and Wagstaffe contained within a contemporary cartouche; the lid has a goat crest. Total weight 2976g, 95.6 troy oz. Height 32.5cm (to top of lid), 22.2cm (to top of cup rim). Spread across handles 33cm. Diameter of top 19.5cm. London 1711. Maker Simon Pantin. Britannia standard silver.

  • 1714

    Thomas Port

    10248 George I Antique Silver Cup

    £2,250

    A handsome and very solid antique silver cup of excellent plain form. Extremely heavy gauge. A charming feature is the bird shaped terminal to each of the twin side handles. Weight 646 grams, 20.7 troy ounces. Height 13.5cm. Spread 21cm. Diameter 12.7cm. London 1714. Maker Thomas Port. Britannia standard silver. 18th century.

  • 1717

    Thomas Parr

    9930 George I Silver Porringer

    £1,950

    A fine antique silver porringer with bands of ribbing to the lower body and a broad rope twist band above. Britannia standard silver*. Good size. Hand engraved to the front within an expansive embossed cartouche, typical of the Queen Anne period, is an armorial crest of a lion. Excellent patina. Contains 930ml. Weight 436 grams, 14 troy ounces. Height 13.8cm. Diameter 13cm. Spread 20.5 cm. London 1717. Maker Thomas Parr.

  • 1732

     

    9901 Antique Silver Scandinavian Peg Beaker

    £1,850

    Possibly Norwegian or Baltic. A rare piece of parcel gilt silver of tapering straight sided form. With bright gilt banding to the foot, rim, and interior. 18th century. Faintly pricked out at the rim with the year “Anno 1732”. To the front is an engraved cartouche with “HNS Lemesand”. While peg tankards are traditional Scandinavian drinking vessels it is very unusual to find a beaker pegged in this fashion. A charming feature is the way that the pegs have been disguised on the front as flower heads. Contains 520 ml. Weight 220 grams, 7ozs. Height 13cm. Diameter 10.9 (top), 7.3cm (base). Stamped underneath with the maker’s mark “FR” double struck. Scandinavian – possibly Norwegian or Baltic. Circa 1732

  • 1745

    Gabriel Sleath

    10188 George II Antique Silver Cup and Cover

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    An excellent antique silver cup with matching cover having a traditional campana shape and acanthus leaf side handles. The lid and body have broad bands of embossed shell scrolls with vine leaf and grape ornament. Excellent plain style and very good weight. To the front is a large and finely engraved armorial within a foliate scroll cartouche, the lid with a dog crest. Total weight 1229 grams, 39.5 troy ounces. Cup 855 grams, 27.4 troy ounces. Lid 374 grams,12 troy ounces. Height 26cm (to top of lid finial), 13cm (to top of cup rim). Spread across handles 23.2cm. Diameter of top 13cm. London 1745. Maker Gabriel Sleath. 18th century.

  • Circa 1750

     

    9923 Antique Silver Coconut Cup

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    A very charming piece of antique silver. The coconut cup is mounted with an engraved and scalloped silver rim and a low spreading silver foot. The very nice period features include the heart shaped supports at the base of the twin side handles and the little flower shaped nut attaching the silver foot to the coconut. Height 9.2cm (rim), 9.8cm top of (handle). Diameter 8.3cm. Makers mark only “MF” double struck. Probably English circa 1750.

  • Circa 1750

    Modin

    9929 Antique Swedish Silver Beaker

    £950

    Of sporting interest. An antique silver beaker of tapering form, the lower body is embossed and chased all round with a boar hunting scene. Small size. Gilded to the top rim, base and interior. Contains 150 ml. Weight 57 grams, 1.8 troy ounces. Height 8.9cm. Diameter 7.5c, (top), 4.4cm (base). Stamped underneath with Swedish silver marks for Sundersvall. Maker J.P Modin. Circa 1750.

  • 1773

    John Lautier

    8086 George III Silver Fox Stirrup Cup

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    A beautifully modelled antique sterling silver stirrup cup in the form of a fox head. Fine features and lovely expressive face. Weight 147 grams, 4.7 troy ounces. Length 11.5 cm. Width 10 cm. English silver hallmarks on the rim for London 1773. Maker John Lautier.

  • 1784

    George Walker I

    9849 George III Silver Beaker

    £1,950

    A very nice piece of English provincial silver. This rare antique silver beaker, of barrel form, has 2 concentric bands and vertical line engraving to represent the pieces of wood forming the barrel. Underneath are the engraved initials S.M.D. Contains 175ml. Weight 101 grams, 3.2 troy ounces. Height 7.5cm. Diameter 6.5cm. Chester 1784. Maker George Walker I. Sterling silver.

  • 1796

    Erik Ernander

    9907 Antique Silver Swedish Vases

    £1,950

    A large harlequin pair of antique silver vases, or ale glasses, with gilded bands to the top and base rims, and fully gilded interior. Each has an expansive band of engraved decoration to the body, one vase with initials “C.O.D” prick engraved to the front. Very similar in weight and size, the vases have differing decorations. Total weight 771 grams (381/390), 24.7 troy ounces. Height 20.7/20.4cm. Diameter 14.5/14.3cm. Swedish silver stamps. Maker E. Ernander. Date mark O2 for 1796.

  • 1799

    James Darquits

    9189 George III Antique Silver Beaker

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    A good antique sterling silver tumbler with tapering sides and flat foot. Plain style. Hand engraved with 2 separate small crests. Contains 365 ml. Weight 187 grams, 6 troy ounces. Height 10 cm. Diameter of top 8 cm. London 1799. Maker James Darquits.

  • Circa 1800

     

    9255 Antique Silver Coconut Cup

    £950

    An antique silver mounted coconut cup on a tall spreading foot. Good size and condition. The bowl is profusely carved and the four vignettes show 1) crowned monogram, 2) a mountain scene with houses in the foreground, a river and bridge, 3) a forest scene with a monument surrounded by a bird, dog and lamb 4) a carved still life roundel. There is a silver mount to the top and base, and there is also a shaped collar where the base meets the cup. The top mount has an inscription. Contains 400 ml. Height 15.5 cm. Diameter 8 cm. Unmarked. Probably continental, circa 1800.

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