waxantiques

Cup / Goblet / Porringer

Drinking plays an important role in the enjoyment of life. Browse our collection of sterling silver cups, goblets, beakers, porringers and specialist drinking vessels. An excellent range of early silver examples for the collector which are ideal for practical use and make a perfect gift.

Cups and Trophies, Goblets & Chalices, Beakers & Tumbler Cups
Coconut Cups and Quaiches, Porringers and Bleeding Bowls, Stirrup and Wager Cups

Silver Cups and Trophies. Large size goblets and 2 handled cups are often given as trophy prizes and many have interesting presentation inscriptions. These cups are often used as wine coolers and make fascinating conversation pieces.

Silver Wine Goblets were popular in England during the 17th century until they were superceded by glass drinking vessels in the late 1600s. Silver goblets made a comeback in the mid 18th century. Church communion Chalices can be found dating back to as early as 1560. They sometimes have a cover which doubles as a paten.

Antique Silver Beakers date back to the early 1600s in Europe. They have remained popular up until the present day and are generally of a simple flared form. Sometimes double beakers are found which fit together in the shape of a barrel.
The “Camp Canteen”, dating from the late 17th century onwards, is a travelling set consisting of a beaker fitted inside with cutlery, condiments and possibly a corkscrew.

Silver Tumbler Cups were made from the mid 17th century onwards. They are made from thick gauge sheet silver which was hammered up so that the sides become thinner towards the top and the rounded base would have the greater weight. When they are knocked over they will automatically right themselves. A very useful drinking cup to use onboard ship.

Antique Silver Mounted Coconut Cups. Coconuts were prized in early times for their healing powers and drinking vessels were often formed from them. The coconut cup is a variety of standing cup, made and used in Europe in the 15th and 16th Century, with a revival in Georgian England. Usually they have a pedestal foot or 3 ornamental feet and are mounted in silver or Old Sheffield plate. Many coconuts were carved on board ship by the sailors (or prisoners of war).

Silver Quaiches. Used in Scotland for centuries, the quaiche is a shallow cup with two, or even three, side handles used to drink spirits such as whiskey or brandy. It is a social drinking vessel, symbolic of friendship and trust, which one person would pass to another with both hands (which would render them incapable of holding a secret weapon). In the centre of the basin usually lies a large coin or medallion, often engraved with a coat of arms, a set of initials, a motto, or a toast such as ‘cheers!’ Over the years the quaiche has become a traditional gift at special occasions such as weddings and christenings.

Porringers and Bleeding Bowls. In the past, people from all levels of society took their food in forms unfamiliar today. Everyday nourishment depended heavily on eggs, milk, oats and grains. Ale, sack mead, wine, spices, sultanas and sugar were added for flavor. The gruel, porridge, potage (soup), caudle and other sloppy warm mixtures were partially drunk and partially eaten with a spoon. They were served in 2 handled cups, often with a cover to keep it warm.

Silver Porringers are two handled bowls and some have a cover. They can also be known as caudle cups although the origin of the porringer was for porridge and the caudle cup was for a type of broth. From the eighteenth century onwards, porringers and cups and covers were used mainly as centrepieces or ornaments. In recent times they have seen a resurgence in popularity for drinking and on the dining table. They make a very attractive baby gift.

Silver Bleeding Bowls may have been used for medical purposes however many people think that these shallow bowls were more likely to have been eating vessels, especially for feeding the sick.

Figural Cups, Stirrup Cups and Wager Cups

Silver Stirrup Cups in silver didn’t become popular until the mid 18th century. The name derives from a cup of wine or other alcoholic drink offered to a person on horseback who is about to depart on a journey (with one’s feet in the stirrups). This term is now more associated with the cup used at the traditional fox hunt. The stirrup cup is usually ornamental and often in the form of a fox head.

Silver Wager Cups.
Marriage cups. These highly collectible silver double drinking vessels are also known as marriage cups. The idea is to drink the contents of the large cup (the lady’s skirt) without spilling the drink inside the small cup. The bride would drink from the small cup, the groom from the large cup.
Windmill cups were used as a drinking game. First fill the cup up with a liquor of choice and spin the windmill sails (either by hand or by blowing the horn). The challenge is to drink the contents of the cup before the sails stop. The clock hands on some windmills also revolve with the sails and a penalty would be due depending on the number where the hand (pointer) stopped.”

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Cup / Goblet / Porringer

Drinking plays an important role in the enjoyment of life. Browse our collection of sterling silver cups, goblets, beakers, porringers and specialist drinking vessels. An excellent range of early silver examples for the collector which are ideal for practical use and make a perfect gift.

Cups and Trophies, Goblets & Chalices, Beakers & Tumbler Cups
Coconut Cups and Quaiches, Porringers and Bleeding Bowls, Stirrup and Wager Cups

Silver Cups and Trophies. Large size goblets and 2 handled cups are often given as trophy prizes and many have interesting presentation inscriptions. These cups are often used as wine coolers and make fascinating conversation pieces.

Silver Wine Goblets were popular in England during the 17th century until they were superceded by glass drinking vessels in the late 1600s. Silver goblets made a comeback in the mid 18th century. Church communion Chalices can be found dating back to as early as 1560. They sometimes have a cover which doubles as a paten.

Antique Silver Beakers date back to the early 1600s in Europe. They have remained popular up until the present day and are generally of a simple flared form. Sometimes double beakers are found which fit together in the shape of a barrel.
The “Camp Canteen”, dating from the late 17th century onwards, is a travelling set consisting of a beaker fitted inside with cutlery, condiments and possibly a corkscrew.

Silver Tumbler Cups were made from the mid 17th century onwards. They are made from thick gauge sheet silver which was hammered up so that the sides become thinner towards the top and the rounded base would have the greater weight. When they are knocked over they will automatically right themselves. A very useful drinking cup to use onboard ship.

Antique Silver Mounted Coconut Cups. Coconuts were prized in early times for their healing powers and drinking vessels were often formed from them. The coconut cup is a variety of standing cup, made and used in Europe in the 15th and 16th Century, with a revival in Georgian England. Usually they have a pedestal foot or 3 ornamental feet and are mounted in silver or Old Sheffield plate. Many coconuts were carved on board ship by the sailors (or prisoners of war).

Silver Quaiches. Used in Scotland for centuries, the quaiche is a shallow cup with two, or even three, side handles used to drink spirits such as whiskey or brandy. It is a social drinking vessel, symbolic of friendship and trust, which one person would pass to another with both hands (which would render them incapable of holding a secret weapon). In the centre of the basin usually lies a large coin or medallion, often engraved with a coat of arms, a set of initials, a motto, or a toast such as ‘cheers!’ Over the years the quaiche has become a traditional gift at special occasions such as weddings and christenings.

Porringers and Bleeding Bowls. In the past, people from all levels of society took their food in forms unfamiliar today. Everyday nourishment depended heavily on eggs, milk, oats and grains. Ale, sack mead, wine, spices, sultanas and sugar were added for flavor. The gruel, porridge, potage (soup), caudle and other sloppy warm mixtures were partially drunk and partially eaten with a spoon. They were served in 2 handled cups, often with a cover to keep it warm.

Silver Porringers are two handled bowls and some have a cover. They can also be known as caudle cups although the origin of the porringer was for porridge and the caudle cup was for a type of broth. From the eighteenth century onwards, porringers and cups and covers were used mainly as centrepieces or ornaments. In recent times they have seen a resurgence in popularity for drinking and on the dining table. They make a very attractive baby gift.

Silver Bleeding Bowls may have been used for medical purposes however many people think that these shallow bowls were more likely to have been eating vessels, especially for feeding the sick.

Figural Cups, Stirrup Cups and Wager Cups

Silver Stirrup Cups in silver didn’t become popular until the mid 18th century. The name derives from a cup of wine or other alcoholic drink offered to a person on horseback who is about to depart on a journey (with one’s feet in the stirrups). This term is now more associated with the cup used at the traditional fox hunt. The stirrup cup is usually ornamental and often in the form of a fox head.

Silver Wager Cups.
Marriage cups. These highly collectible silver double drinking vessels are also known as marriage cups. The idea is to drink the contents of the large cup (the lady’s skirt) without spilling the drink inside the small cup. The bride would drink from the small cup, the groom from the large cup.
Windmill cups were used as a drinking game. First fill the cup up with a liquor of choice and spin the windmill sails (either by hand or by blowing the horn). The challenge is to drink the contents of the cup before the sails stop. The clock hands on some windmills also revolve with the sails and a penalty would be due depending on the number where the hand (pointer) stopped.”

  • Circa 1550

    Leonhard Bram

    9788 Antique Swiss Silver Beaker

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    An exceptionally early drinking cup dating from the 16th century. This parcel gilt beaker has a cylindrical tumbler form and stands on a shallow foot. The cup still retains the original hand beaten finish. There is a gilded band of decoration around the top with foliate scrolls and roundels on a hatched background. The foot has a gilt band and feather decorated border. The underside retains traces of the old, blobby mercury solder used in the original manufacture over 450 years ago. Contains 150 ml. Weight 79 grams, 2.4 troy ounces. Height 6.4cm. Diameter 6.9cm. Stamped underneath with Swiss silver marks for Zurich, Switzerland. Maker Leonhard Bram. Circa 1550. Ref: Eva Losel’s book on Zurich Goldsmiths pages 164 and 360 – see images.

  • 1571

    James Feake

    9918 Elizabeth I Silver Chalice

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    A rare early English chalice dating to the reign of Elizabeth I. A very early date and in very good condition. With straight tapering sides, slightly flared at the top, and would originally have had a cover (paten). Hand beaten finish as you’d expect at this date. The single hatched band of decoration is well executed and the definition is very good. There is applied wire ornament to the stem, the foot has a second band of hatched engraving. Contains 180 ml. Weight of chalice 190 grams, 6.1 troy ounces. Chalice dimensions – height 15.3cm, diameter of top 7.7cm. Extremely good silver marks for London 1571. Maker probably James Feake. Sterling silver.

  • 1625

    Robert Profit

    9989 Charles I Antique Silver Bowl

    £5,950

    An extremely early date. A rare antique silver porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form. The straight sided shape with a simple rim is the earliest type and in keeping with the early date. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Prick marked on the edge of the rim with the initials “MC”. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Diameter 10.3cm. Height 3.5 cm. Spread 14cm. London 1625. Maker “RP” possibly Robert Profit (David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”).

  • 1626

    Richard Blackwell

    9968 Charles I Antique Silver Beaker

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    Dating from the early 1600’s. An early English antique silver beaker of plain tapering design with simple foot wires. Lovely plain form. Excellent patina and hand beaten finish. Contains 250 ml. Weight 120 grams, 3.8 troy ounces. Height 8.9 cm. Diameter 7.0cm (top), 6.0cm (base). London 1626. Sterling silver. Maker’s mark “probably” Richard Blackwell the Elder – see David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”.

  • 1628 - 1635

    Wenzel Zeideler

    9988 Antique German Silver Beaker

    £4,950

    An early Leipzig silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form. Original gilt finish. Hand engraved to the body is a charming design of a tree with outspread branches and large leaves like table tennis bats. Contains 190 ml. Weight 109 grams, 3.5 troy ounces. Height 8.3cm. Diameter 6.7cm (top), 5.2cm (base). Leipzig 1633-1635 Maker Wenzel Zeideler. Circa 1628-30. Marks. Stamped underneath with German silver marks for Leipzig.

  • Circa 1640

     

    9786 German Parcel Gilt Silver Cup & Cover

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    A rare and impressive antique silver standing cup and cover of baluster shape with lobed foot. Large size. The waisted, lobed body is chased with fleur-de-lys and scrolls on a finely matted background. The top has a silver vase of flowers finial. This form is typical of German Renaissance banqueting silver cups and the quality is excellent. Contains 500 ml. Weight 611 grams, 19.6 troy ounces. Height – 40 cm (total), 29.5 cm (cup). Diameter of top 10.6 cm. Stamped by the rim and on the foot with the German town mark “W” possibly Breslau. Makers mark “WO” unidentified. Circa 1640.

  • 1649

    Daniel Gee

    10113 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Cup

    £12,950

    An important piece of early English antique silver dating back to 1649, the year of King Charles I’s execution. This twin handled silver cup, with shaped side handles and spreading circular foot, is possibly a very early example of a porringer, or caudle cup. The body has a hand chased band of decoration at the top with matted roundels and punched motifs below; this more sombre decoration is associated particularly with the Commonwealth period. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the beaded and segmented decoration to the base, very reminiscent of wine tasters of this period. Hand engraved to the front are the initials “MB” surrounded by stars. Weight 286 grams, 9.1 troy ounces. Height 11.6cm. Spread across handles 16cm. Diameter 11.5cm (top), 8.6cm (base). London 1649. Maker “DG” with an anchor for Daniel Gee (*see David Mitchell’s book on “Silversmiths in Stuart and Elizabethan England”). Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1650

     

    9680 Antique Dutch Silver Beaker

    £4,650

    An antique silver beaker of tapering cylindrical form on a cast, coin inset, foot. Bright gilding inside and out. The body is decorated with 3 figures within oval cartouches surrounded by engraved floral and fruit designs. Contains 270 ml. Weight 230 grams, 7.3 troy ounces. Height 13.5cm. Dutch silver marks, possibly Groningen. Maker’s mark 3 anchors. Circa 1650.

  • 1657

    Christopher Shaw

    9384 Antique Commonwealth Period Silver Porringer

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    A very rare piece of early English antique silver. A sterling silver caudle cup with cast serpent shaped side handles and applied ring base. It has the more austere decoration associated with the Commonwealth period, the matted scrolls and punchwork have an appealing naivety. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the decorative base, very reminiscent of the wine tasters of this period. Weight 234 grams, 7.5 troy ounces. Diameter 11 cm. Height 7.5 cm. London 1657. Maker Christopher Shaw – ref. Jackson’s “Silver & Gold Marks” and Dr Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”. A very historic piece.

  • 1673

     

    8394 Charles II Silver Porringer

    £2,250

    A rare early English silver porringer of small size having 2 side handles and belly shape. Lovely original hand beaten finish. Weight 69 grams, 2.2 troy ounces. Height 5.5 cms. Diameter 6 cms. London 1673. Maker IC* listed in Jacksons.

  • 1675

    Simon Romney

    8739 Antique Charles II Silver Porringer

    £7,500

    A rare piece of early English silver. A large 2 handled antique silver porringer of plain form. The matching cover has a capstan shaped finial so that the lid can be turned upside down and used on its own as a saucer. This has the form of a typical early Restoration porringer, with bellied shape and the lid sitting over the upper rim. There is a small silver support either side next to the handle for the lid to sit on. Hand engraved to the front, and repeated on the cover, are the arms and crest for the Yong family of Medhurst, Sussex. Weight 375 grams, 12 troy ounces. Height 14 cm (total), 10 cm (cup), 4.5 cm (lid). Diameter 10 cm. Spread across the handles 17 cm. London 1675. Makers mark “SR”* in a shield (there are 2 similar marks in Jacksons, see page 124 and 129, bottom of the page), probably Simon Romney.

  • 1676

     

    9885 Charles II Beaker

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    An early English antique silver beaker of plain design with simple foot wires. Hand engraved around the top and middle body is a band of hatched foliate decoration, a decoration popular from the Elizabethan period through to this date. Contains 300 ml. Weight 143 grams, 4.5 troy ounces. Height 10.2cm. Diameter of top 8cm. London 1676. Maker “BM” within a heart shaped shield (Jacksons page 141). Sterling silver.

  • 1680

    Robert Smythier

    9097 Antique Charles II Silver Porringer

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    A rare early English porringer with matching lid and side handles. The cup has a clean form with sharp features and rope twist borders. The body with cut card decoration, the lid with acanthus leaf design and ring handle. The front has a large hand engraved armorial and the lid has a crest. Excellent weight and colour. Weight 884 grams, 28.4 troy ounces. Height 17cm (with lid), 12cm (without lid). Spread 21.5cm. Diameter 14.5cm. London 1680. Maker Robert Smythier.

  • 1680

    Thomas Cory

    9904 Charles II Silver Bowl

    £2,850

    An early English silver side handled porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form and shallow bellied shape. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets.The handle is prick marked “I*C 1681 M”. Weight 104 grams, 3.3 troy ounces. Diameter 10.4cm. Height 3.6 cm. Spread 15.4cm. London 1680. Maker Thomas Cory. Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1680

    Johann Hoffler

    10110 Antique Nurnberg Silver Beaker

    £1,250

    A good quality antique silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form and plain style, the body with simulated dotted texture. Simple shape with concentric double ribbed detail to the top. Original light gilt interior. Contain 220ml. Weight 122 grams, 3.9 troy ounces. Height 9cm. Diameter 7cm (top), 5.5cm (base). German silver marks for Nurnberg. Maker Johann Offler. Circa 1680.

  • 1683

    John Duck

    9991 Charles II Antique Silver Beaker

    £11,950

    An early English antique sterling silver beaker of plain tapering design with simple foot wires. Dating from the late 1600’s. Charmingly flat chased with an exuberant scene of exotic birds and foliage in the Chinese style known as “chinoiserie”. To the front there are hand engraved initials “MFD” and the date 1684 and to the reverse are the prick engraved initials “CIE”. Excellent patina and hand beaten finish. Contains 290 ml. Weight 99 grams, 3.1 troy ounces. Height 9.2cm. Diameter 8cm. London 1683. Maker John Duck, well known for his fine period beakers.

  • 1689

    Seth Lofthouse

    9940 William & Mary Antique Chinoiserie Silver Porringer

    £11,750

    A fascinating and rare piece of chinoiserie silver. This early English antique sterling silver porringer, or side handled cup, is flat chased with an exuberant oriental scene incorporating Chinese people and exotic birds. The large bowl, of circular form with flared lip, is ideal for use as a drinking cup or for displaying flowers. Weight 482 grams, 14.4 troy ounces. Height 12.3cm. Diameter 14cm. Spread across the handles 21.5cm. London 1689. Maker Seth Lofthouse. Sterling silver.

  • 1689

     

    10125 William & Mary Antique Silver Cup

    £2,950

    A rare antique silver cup of tapering form on a small applied foot; the curved flutes on the lower body were a popular decoration from the reign of William & Mary through to Queen Anne. This cup never had a handle and was probably intended for drinking tea or coffee. There are faint traces of the original gilding. Contains 150 ml. Weight 108 grams, 2.1 troy ounces. Height 6.5cm. Diameter of top 7.5cm. London 1689. Maker “OG” – see Jacksons page 129.

  • Circa 1690

    Johann Wagner

    9889 German Silver Beaker

    £1,650

    A good quality antique silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form. Plain style and simple shape. Punched snakeskin ornament. Gilt finish. Contains 240 ml. Weight 134 grams, 4.3 troy ounces. Height 8.8cm. Diameter 7.2cm. German silver marks (assay scrape and the pineapple Augsburg town mark). Maker Johann Wagner. Circa 1690.

  • Circa 1691

     

    9800 William and Mary Provincial Silver Beaker

    £5,750

    A rare piece of British provincial silver. A Scottish or Yorkshire silver beaker of plain, tapered cylindrical form having a plain base with simple foot wires. The underside displays very prominent soldering – see condition report. Contains 250 ml. Weight 158 grams, 5 troy ounces. Height 9.9 cm. Diameter 7.8 cm. Yorkshire or Scotland circa 1691. Maker’s mark “Crown over S.S”.

  • 1692

    John Richardson

    9890 William and Mary Chinoiserie Silver Beaker

    £8,760

    An early English antique silver beaker of plain tapering design with simple foot wires. Dating from the late 1600’s. Compact size. Charmingly decorated with a band of hand chased decoration of birds and foliage in the Chinese style known as “chinoiserie”. To the front there is a hand engraved prick dot design containing “F.S” and the date 1693. Excellent patina and hand beaten finish. Contains 160 ml. Weight 74 grams, 2.3 troy ounces. Height 8.1 cm. Diameter 7.2cm. London 1692. Maker John Richardson, a prominent cup and tankard maker known for chinoiserie silver. Sterling silver.

  • 1694

    William Keate

    9836 William & Mary Silver Bowl

    £3,350

    A large early English silver side handled porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form and distinctive bellied shape. With a shaped and pierced handle. Very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Weight 244 grams, 7.8 troy ounces. Diameter 12.7 cm. Height 5 cm. Spread 19.7 cm. London 1694. Maker William Keate (also known as William Keatt). Sterling silver.

  • 1696

    Thomas Jenkins

    9781 William III Silver Bowl

    £3,750

    An early English silver side handled porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form. Very charming with the original hand beaten finish. The shaped and pierced handle has initials hand engraved to the centre. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Weight 285 grams, 9.1 troy ounces. Diameter 12.8 cm. Height 9.8 cm. Spread 14.5 cm. London 1696. Maker “TI two escallops between”* attributed to Thomas Jenkins (see Jackson’s “Silver & Gold Marks” and David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”). Sterling silver.

  • 1697

     

    9990 William III Antique Silver Cup

    £4,750

    A very unusual antique sterling silver cup of tapering form on a small applied foot; the simple “S” scroll handle having a beaded rat-tail decoration. The body has four panels of hand applied matting work. Originally this would have been either a small mug or toddy cup for alcoholic beverages or possibly a cup for drinking tea or chocolate. Contains 155ml. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Height 7.7cm. Diameter of top 7.2cm. Spread across the handle 9cm. London 1697. Maker unknown.

  • Circa 1701

     

    9903 Antique Silver Armorial Beaker

    £1,150

    A very interesting antique silver cup of tapering form and plain style. Simple shape with bright gilt bands to the rim and base, and gilded interior. Good gauge silver and weight. The base is beautifully engraved with an armorial dated 1701, possibly a town arms. Engraved initials to the front. Contains 350 ml. Weight 136 grams, 4.3 troy ounces. Height 9.2cm. Diameter 8cm (top), 6.3cm (base). Unmarked silver. Continental. Circa 1701.

  • 1717

    Thomas Parr

    9930 George I Silver Porringer

    £1,950

    A fine antique silver porringer with bands of ribbing to the lower body and a broad rope twist band above. Britannia standard silver*. Good size. Hand engraved to the front within an expansive embossed cartouche, typical of the Queen Anne period, is an armorial crest of a lion. Excellent patina. Contains 930ml. Weight 436 grams, 14 troy ounces. Height 13.8cm. Diameter 13cm. Spread 20.5 cm. London 1717. Maker Thomas Parr.

  • 1718

    Paul de Lamerie

    9365 George I Silver Cup by Paul de Lamerie

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    An outstanding early antique silver cup and cover with acanthus leaf topped side handles. By the sought after Huguenot silversmith Paul de Lamerie. Britannia standard silver*. Lovely plain style, very large size and heavy weight. Excellent patina. To the front is an expansive and finely engraved armorial crest belonging to TREBY quartering Grange for the Rt Hon George Treby, MP. Weight 1996 grams, 64.1 troy ounces. Height 25.5cm (total), 17cm (cup only). Diameter of cup 14.7cm. Spread 26cm. London 1718. Maker Paul de Lamerie.

  • 1732

     

    9901 Antique Silver Scandinavian Peg Beaker

    £1,850

    Possibly Norwegian or Baltic. A rare piece of parcel gilt silver of tapering straight sided form. With bright gilt banding to the foot, rim, and interior. 18th century. Faintly pricked out at the rim with the year “Anno 1732”. To the front is an engraved cartouche with “HNS Lemesand”. While peg tankards are traditional Scandinavian drinking vessels it is very unusual to find a beaker pegged in this fashion. A charming feature is the way that the pegs have been disguised on the front as flower heads. Contains 520 ml. Weight 220 grams, 7ozs. Height 13cm. Diameter 10.9 (top), 7.3cm (base). Stamped underneath with the maker’s mark “FR” double struck. Scandinavian – possibly Norwegian or Baltic. Circa 1732

  • Circa 1733

    Ludvig Mouritzen Svab

    10122 Norwegian Antique Silver Beaker

    £1,950

    An excellent quality antique silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form and plain style, the body with simulated dotted texture and plain circular cartouche. Simple shape with concentric double ribbed detail to the top and 3 ball feet. Original gilt interior. Contains 200 ml. Weight 122 grams, 3.9 troy ounces. Height 8.5cm. Diameter 7.5cm. Made in Larvik, Norway. Maker Ludvig Mouritzen Svab. Circa 1733.

  • Circa 1750

    William Townsend

    9668 Set of 3 Antique Silver Cups

    £5,650

    A fine quality George II sterling silver cup on a spreading foot. The scroll side handles have acanthus leaf mounts. The accompanying pair of smaller silver cups make a matching set. Each cup has a large hand engraved armorial to the front within a decorative cartouche and the scratch weight incised below. Excellent colour and very heavy weight. The large cup has a presentation inscription underneath to Harold Heinz, president of the H.J Heinz company. Large cup weight 1059 grams, 34 troy ounces. Height 17.6cm. Spread 26.5cm. Diameter 14.2cm. Small cups weigh 467 grams each, 15.01 troy ounces and 471 grams, 15.10 troy ounces. Height 13cm. Spread 17cm. Diameter 10.1cm. Large cup Dublin circa 1750, maker William Townsend. Smaller cups unmarked silver.

  • Circa 1750

     

    9923 Antique Silver Coconut Cup

    £950

    A very charming piece of antique silver. The coconut cup is mounted with an engraved and scalloped silver rim and a low spreading silver foot. The very nice period features include the heart shaped supports at the base of the twin side handles and the little flower shaped nut attaching the silver foot to the coconut. Height 9.2cm (rim), 9.8cm top of (handle). Diameter 8.3cm. Makers mark only “MF” double struck. Probably English circa 1750.

  • Circa 1750

    Modin

    9929 Antique Swedish Silver Beaker

    £950

    Of sporting interest. An antique silver beaker of tapering form, the lower body is embossed and chased all round with a boar hunting scene. Small size. Gilded to the top rim, base and interior. Contains 150 ml. Weight 57 grams, 1.8 troy ounces. Height 8.9cm. Diameter 7.5c, (top), 4.4cm (base). Stamped underneath with Swedish silver marks for Sundersvall. Maker J.P Modin. Circa 1750.

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