waxantiques

Wine Accessories

Antique wine accessories such as Corkscrews, Tasters, Labels, Brandy Pans and Lemon Strainers were often made in silver and are a popular collecting field.

Silver Corkscrews were made for opening wine bottles and also for scent bottles. They are available in many different forms include travelling and novelty shapes.

Wine Tasters. The saucer shaped taster was already in use as early as the 14th century BC in Minoan Crete and has been essential in the production of wine right through to the present time. It is used by the sommelier to determine a wine’s quality by assessing the color, clarity, bouquet and taste. The majority of wine tasters in existence are French. The owners often engraved their name on the taster whose single flat handle often accommodated a neck cord. Very few English wine tasters were made because wine was not a national product however a number were produced during a short period in the second half of the 17th century. These English examples are rare and anything after this date is even rarer. The early English examples were in the shape of a flat bowl, often with simple wire handles (these often have original rough soldering which can appear “blobby”).

Brandy Saucepans made their first appearance in this country during the Queen Anne period and continued to be made until the mid 19th century. Some have spouts. The size varies but generally the early examples tend to be smaller. Sometimes they have three legs, these are called skillets, and they are quite rare.
Many Brandy Bowls are Dutch in origin. The two-handled bowls were used to celebrate childbirth but may have been passed around at other festive occasions as well when brandewijn, liquor distilled from wine to which sugar and raisins were added, would be served from them with a spoon.

Orange or lemon strainers were peculiar to the 18th century and were probably used in conjunction with punch bowls to filter out the fruit pips. They were made with one or two handles. The one handled strainer sometimes had a small tongue or lug on the opposite side of the handle which may have been used to hook it on to the side of the punch bowl. The strainers are normally marked in the piercing in the centre of the bowl. These strainers are popularly used nowadays as tea strainers although the size is larger than a normal tea strainer.

Wine Labels, also known as “bottle tickets”, appear to have originated in the second quarter of the 18th century. They were made in many attractive designs and are a popular collecting field. Generally, the label is suspended around the neck of the bottle by a chain, although some are formed as plain collars which slip over the neck, or formed as a plain rectangle hinged from a wire ring. Among the many good makers are Hester Bateman and family, Phipps & Robinson, Samuel Bradley, Mary Binley and Paul Storr.

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Wine Accessories

Antique wine accessories such as Corkscrews, Tasters, Labels, Brandy Pans and Lemon Strainers were often made in silver and are a popular collecting field.

Silver Corkscrews were made for opening wine bottles and also for scent bottles. They are available in many different forms include travelling and novelty shapes.

Wine Tasters. The saucer shaped taster was already in use as early as the 14th century BC in Minoan Crete and has been essential in the production of wine right through to the present time. It is used by the sommelier to determine a wine’s quality by assessing the color, clarity, bouquet and taste. The majority of wine tasters in existence are French. The owners often engraved their name on the taster whose single flat handle often accommodated a neck cord. Very few English wine tasters were made because wine was not a national product however a number were produced during a short period in the second half of the 17th century. These English examples are rare and anything after this date is even rarer. The early English examples were in the shape of a flat bowl, often with simple wire handles (these often have original rough soldering which can appear “blobby”).

Brandy Saucepans made their first appearance in this country during the Queen Anne period and continued to be made until the mid 19th century. Some have spouts. The size varies but generally the early examples tend to be smaller. Sometimes they have three legs, these are called skillets, and they are quite rare.
Many Brandy Bowls are Dutch in origin. The two-handled bowls were used to celebrate childbirth but may have been passed around at other festive occasions as well when brandewijn, liquor distilled from wine to which sugar and raisins were added, would be served from them with a spoon.

Orange or lemon strainers were peculiar to the 18th century and were probably used in conjunction with punch bowls to filter out the fruit pips. They were made with one or two handles. The one handled strainer sometimes had a small tongue or lug on the opposite side of the handle which may have been used to hook it on to the side of the punch bowl. The strainers are normally marked in the piercing in the centre of the bowl. These strainers are popularly used nowadays as tea strainers although the size is larger than a normal tea strainer.

Wine Labels, also known as “bottle tickets”, appear to have originated in the second quarter of the 18th century. They were made in many attractive designs and are a popular collecting field. Generally, the label is suspended around the neck of the bottle by a chain, although some are formed as plain collars which slip over the neck, or formed as a plain rectangle hinged from a wire ring. Among the many good makers are Hester Bateman and family, Phipps & Robinson, Samuel Bradley, Mary Binley and Paul Storr.

  • Circa 1655

     

    10189 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Wine Taster

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    A superb early English silver dish of circular shallow form with simple wire handles. Very rare and charming small size. The design of punched beading and lobes is typical of the period and forms a flower design in the base of the bowl. Stamped around the rim with owner’s initials “ALS”. Weight 19 grams, less than one troy ounce. Height 2.2cm (to top of handle). Diameter 6.2cm. Spread across handles 8.5cm. London circa 1655. Maker “WH.”

  • 1673

    George Watkins

    10182 Charles II Antique Silver Wine Taster

    £2,750

    A rare early English miniature wine taster from the reign of Charles II. Very charming size. This little cup has a circular form with simple wirework handles and embossed grape decoration. Weight 21 grams, less than 1 troy ounce. Height 2 cm approx. Diameter of top 6.1cm. Spread across handles 8.9cm. London 1673. Made by George Watkins. Sterling silver.

  • 1683

    Samuel Hawkes

    9523 Charles II Silver Wine Taster

    £2,550

    A rare early English two-handled wine taster in sterling silver from the reign of Charles II. With a simple plain form and wirework handles. Excellent patina and faint signs of the hand hammered finish. Owners initials inscribed underneath. Weight 27 grams, just under 1 troy ounce. Height 2.2 cm (bowl), 3.5 cm (to top of handle). Diameter of top 6.5 cm. Spread across handles 9.2 cm. London 1683. Marked inside at the bottom with the makers mark “SH” within a heart shaped shield, probably Samuel Hawkes (*see David Mitchell’s book on “Silversmiths in Stuart and Elizabethan England”).

  • Circa 1685

     

    9779 Antique Dutch Silver Brandy Bowl

    £1,650

    An antique Dutch silver bowl with lobed decoration and cast pierced handles showing three children climbing on a grape vine. Good large size. Weight 213 grams, 6.8 troy ounces. Height 6cm. Spread 24.21cm. Diameter 14.3cm. Dutch silver marks for Haarlem 1740.

  • Circa 1690

    Heinrich Eichler

    10107 Antique German Silver Wine Taster

    £950

    A pretty little 17th century silver dish of oval form with scalloped sides and shaped side handles. Gilt finish to the interior and outside top rim. The centre, with the flower decoration typical of the period and embossed star design, retains a silver finish. Weight 76 grams, 2.4 troy ounces. Top measures 11.1 x 9.9cm. Width across handles 13.2cm. Height 2.2cm, 3.1cm to top of handle. Augsburg, Germany. Maker Heinrich Eichler. Circa 1690.

  • Circa 1700

     

    9895 Antique Silver Wine Taster

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    A rare early antique silver wine taster of simple plain form in the shape of a flat bowl with a raised central dome. Very charming with the original hand beaten silver. At a later date the reverse side has been gilded for use as a trencher salt and the crest of a beaver holding a fish hand engraved to the front. Weight 78 grams, 2.5 troy ounces approx. Height 2.1cm. Diameter 11.47cm. Unmarked silver. Circa 1700. Probably English.

  • Circa 1720

    John Murch

    9749 Antique Exeter Silver Brandy Pan

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    A rare piece of early provincial silver. An antique silver brandy warmer of bellied form with a turned wooden handle. Attractive plain style. Contains 240 ml. Total weight 153 grams, 4.9 troy ounces. Height of pan 6cm. Diameter of top 8.5cm. Spread 26cm. Exeter circa 1720. Maker John Murch.

    Literature. Brandy Saucepans made their first appearance in this country during the Queen Anne period and continued to be made until the mid 19th century. Some have spouts. The size varies but generally the early examples tend to be smaller. Sometimes they have three legs, these are called skillets, and they are quite rare.

  • 1722

    John Albright

    9942 George I Antique Silver Strainer

    £1,650

    A rare early English antique sterling silver strainer of circular form with decorative side handles. A very charming and useful size; although originally made as a lemon strainer this could be used nowadays as a tea strainer. The bowl is pierced with a design of scrolls and other motifs and contemporary owner’s initials are engraved to one handle. Weight 75 grams, 2.4 troy oz. Spread 16.8cm. Diameter 8.5cm. Height 2.9cm. London 1722. Maker John Albright. Sterling silver

  • Circa 1750

    John Harvey I

    9475 Georgian Silver Wine Label

    £285

    A very pretty antique sterling silver bottle ticket with a silver chain. Good quality with cast vine decoration and a scroll across the centre engraved “SHERRY”. Weight 20 grams. Measures 6.2 x 4.5 cm. Stamped with makers mark for John Harvey I, London. Circa 1750.

  • 1766

    Nathaniel Appleton & Anne Smith

    9974 George III Antique Silver Strainer

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    An antique sterling silver strainer of circular form with a single shaped handle. A very charming and useful size; although originally made as a lemon strainer this could be used nowadays as a tea strainer. The bowl is pierced with a flower design. Weight 67 grams, 2.1 troy oz. Spread 12.9cm. Diameter 8.8cm. Height 2.9cm. London 1766. Maker Nathaniel Appleton & Anne Smith. Sterling silver.

  • 1769

     

    8310 Antique Russian Silver Brandy Sauce Pan

    £475

    A Russian silver brandy warmer with simple plain styling. Good early date. The circular bowl has a reeded border, flat handle and pull-off cover. Original gilt interior. Weight 284 grams, 9.1 troy ounces. Diameter 11.5 cm. Spread 20 cm. Height 7 cm. Marked on lid and base with Russian silver marks, 84 and makers mark. Date mark for 1769.

  • Circa 1770

     

    9732 Antique French Silver Wine Taster

    £975

    A rare antique silver wine taster (or tasse de vin) of simple plain form with a serpent handle. Excellent quality and heavy gauge silver. Weight 166 grams, 5.3 troy ounces. Height 3.5 cm (4.0 cms to top of handle). Diameter 8 cm. Spread 11.75 cm. Stamped on the base with French silver marks. Circa 1770. Also marked on handle and on the rim.

  • 1770

    Margaret Binley

    9287 Antique Silver Wine Label

    £295

    A classical style antique sterling silver bottle ticket of half moon design with feather edge border. The word “HOCK” is hand engraved to the front. Weight 6 grams. Measures 4 x 4.2cms. Makers mark only. Margaret Binley. Circa 1770.

  • 1819

    Joseph Willmore

    9483 Georgian Silver Wine Label

    £195

    An unusual antique sterling silver bottle ticket with a silver chain. Cast in the form of the letter “S” the label has leaf and face mask decoration. Weight 5 grams. Measures 2.5 x 1.9cm. Birmingham 1819. Maker Joseph Wilmore.

  • 1826

    Thomas Edwards

    9772 Antique Silver Wine Label

    £175

    A handsome antique sterling silver bottle ticket in the form of a vine leaf pierced for SHERRY. Good decorative detail. Weight 22 grams, less than 1 troy ounce. Measures 8.5 x 5.8 cm. London 1826. Maker Thomas Edwards. Sterling silver.

  • 1837

    George Unite

    9785 Antique Silver Wine Label

    £220

    An unusual silver bottle ticket with a large bunch of grapes on a vine leaf background. Pierced to the front with “RUM”. Weight 9 grams. Measures 6.3 x 3.6 cm. Birmingham 1837. Maker George Unite. Sterling silver.

  • 1864

    Henry Aston

    7976 Victorian Silver Brandy Label

    £185

    A very pretty antique silver label with shaped border and the word “BRANDY” engraved on the front. The front has hand engraved bordered of leaf scrolls. Weight 9 grams. Measures 5.5 x 3 cm. Birmingham 1864. Maker Henry Aston.

  • 1992

    C.J. Vander

    9351 Vintage Silver Wine Label

    £240

    A collectors item. An excellent quality sterling silver bottle ticket with a silver chain. Very heavy with an unusual modern design and applied across the centre with “WHISKY”. Weight 49 grams, 1.5 troy ounce. Measures 8.1 x 5.4 cm. Fully hallmarked across the front for London 1992. Maker CJ Vander.

  • 1992

    C.J. Vander

    9752 Vintage Silver Spirit Label

    £295

    A modern silver bottle ticket in the stylised form of a cast vine leaf with pierced cluster of grapes. “WHISKY” is applied across the curved title scroll. Numbered ‘14’ on reverse. Weight 49 grams, 1.5 troy ounces.Measures 8cm long. London 1992. Maker C.J. Vander Ltd, London. Sterling silver.

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