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Drinking Vessels

Over the centuries, drinking has played an important role in increasing the enjoyment of life. Not only a social pleasure and an aid to relaxation but “a small tipple” also greatly enhances the pleasure of eating. These dazzling antique sterling silver drinking vessels come in many styles to help you enjoy your drinking experience.

Cups, Goblets and Porringers, Jugs, Ewers and Decanters, Tankards and Mugs

Alcohol has its roots in Ancient History. Beer jugs were made as early as 10,000 BC, vineyards were planted back in Biblical times and the ancient Egyptians enjoyed both beer and wine. The Chinese considered alcohol as a spiritual food.

In England, drinking water was not commonly available until the late 19th century and so beer, the people’s beverage, was drunk as a substitute for water. Wine, imported from France, Germany, Spain and Portugal, was expensive and consumed by the wealthy classes. Alcohol spirits were readily available since the Middle Ages, brandy being originally produced for medicinal purposes and only available in apothecaries.

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Drinking Vessels

Over the centuries, drinking has played an important role in increasing the enjoyment of life. Not only a social pleasure and an aid to relaxation but “a small tipple” also greatly enhances the pleasure of eating. These dazzling antique sterling silver drinking vessels come in many styles to help you enjoy your drinking experience.

Cups, Goblets and Porringers, Jugs, Ewers and Decanters, Tankards and Mugs

Alcohol has its roots in Ancient History. Beer jugs were made as early as 10,000 BC, vineyards were planted back in Biblical times and the ancient Egyptians enjoyed both beer and wine. The Chinese considered alcohol as a spiritual food.

In England, drinking water was not commonly available until the late 19th century and so beer, the people’s beverage, was drunk as a substitute for water. Wine, imported from France, Germany, Spain and Portugal, was expensive and consumed by the wealthy classes. Alcohol spirits were readily available since the Middle Ages, brandy being originally produced for medicinal purposes and only available in apothecaries.

  • Circa 1574

    Lawrence Stratford

    10321 Elizabeth I Antique Silver Chalice

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    Originating from the English provincial town of Dorchester in Dorset, this fine early English chalice dates to the reign of Elizabeth I. It has the standard design for Elizabethan communion cups with straight tapering sides and a slightly flared top; with wire ornament applied to the stem and hammered egg and dart frieze to the foot. The beautifully hatched decorative bands below the top edge of the cup are typical for the period, they are well executed and with good definition. Most likely this cup has been made from pre-reformation silver and it has the lovely hand beaten finish you’d expect at this date. The removable cover (paten) bears the date of 1574. Superb antique colour.
    Contains 250 ml. Chalice weight 231 grams, 7.4 troy oz. Height 20.2cm, diameter of top 9.9cm. Cover weight 55 grams, 1.7 troy oz. Height 2.4cm, diameter 9cm. London c.1574.
    Maker’s mark only for Lawrence Stratford. Sterling silver. 16th century.

  • 1625

    Robert Profit

    9989 Charles I Antique Silver Bowl

    £5,950

    An extremely early date. A rare antique silver porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form. The straight sided shape with a simple rim is the earliest type and in keeping with the early date. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets. Prick marked on the edge of the rim with the initials “MC”. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Diameter 10.3cm. Height 3.5 cm. Spread 14cm. London 1625. Maker “RP” possibly Robert Profit (David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”).

  • 1631

     

    10256 Charles I Antique Silver Cup

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    A superb early English silver wine cup of very plain form with a cast baluster stem and spreading foot. This large goblet has an excellent patina, good weight, and sits very well in the hand. To the front is a well-executed armorial for Dr Thomas Eden, hand engraved, the style is typical of the Charles I period with the shield within a laurel-wreath. This is an outstanding piece of antique silver in every way. Contains 430 ml. Weight 326 grams, 10.4 troy ounces. Height 19.8cm. Diameter 9.2cm (top), 9cm (foot). London 1631. Maker “HM”. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1635

    Henry Starkey

    10306 Charles I Antique Silver Wine Cup

    £18,500

    A rare English silver wine cup of very plain form on a cast baluster stem and spreading foot. This goblet has a superb patina and is perfectly styled for use in modern day times with its unusual tapering bowl. The original slightly hand beaten finish is visible on the inside. This is a very special piece of antique silver.

  • 1649

    Daniel Gee

    10113 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Cup

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    An important piece of early English antique silver dating back to 1649, the year of King Charles I’s execution. This twin handled silver cup, with shaped side handles and spreading circular foot, is possibly a very early example of a porringer, or caudle cup. The body has a hand chased band of decoration at the top with matted roundels and punched motifs below; this more sombre decoration is associated particularly with the Commonwealth period. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the beaded and segmented decoration to the base, very reminiscent of wine tasters of this period. Hand engraved to the front are the initials “MB” surrounded by stars. Weight 286 grams, 9.1 troy ounces. Height 11.6cm. Spread across handles 16cm. Diameter 11.5cm (top), 8.6cm (base). London 1649. Maker “DG” with an anchor for Daniel Gee (*see David Mitchell’s book on “Silversmiths in Stuart and Elizabethan England”). Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1650

     

    9680 Antique Dutch Silver Beaker

    £4,650

    An antique silver beaker of tapering cylindrical form on a cast, coin inset, foot. Bright gilding inside and out. The body is decorated with 3 figures within oval cartouches surrounded by engraved floral and fruit designs. Contains 270 ml. Weight 230 grams, 7.3 troy ounces. Height 13.5cm. Dutch silver marks, possibly Groningen. Maker’s mark 3 anchors. Circa 1650.

  • 1654

    John Winterton

    10340 Commonwealth Period Antique Silver Beaker

    £2,850

    An early English silver drinking cup of small size. Plain tapering design with a turned over lip and simple foot. Contains 240 ml. Weight 63 grams, 2 troy ounces. Height 7cm. Diameter 7.5cm. London 1654. Maker John Winterton. Sterling silver.

  • 1659

    Anthony Ficketts

    9875 Commonwealth Silver Tankard

    £15,950

    A rare early English silver flat top lidded tankard with a cast, kidney shaped thumbpiece. The S-scroll handle has a shield terminal. Circa 1640 is the earliest date at which this tankard shape occurs and it’s unusual to find a tankard from this turbulent period and early date. Very charming, with hand beaten silver, the tankard displays a lot of character; a nice feature is the pointed front of the lid. Hand engraved to the front with a flat topped shield within ostrich plume feathers, a popular style of engraving from 1660-1690. Contains 1300 ml. Weight 763 grams, 24.5 troy ounces. Height 16.3cm (to top of thumb piece). Spread 15.7 cm. Diameter 11.4cm (inside top), 13.3 cm (base). London 1659. Silver from this period is very rare. Maker Anthony Ficketts, attribution by David Mitchell “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”. Sterling silver.

  • 1662

    Edward Treen

    10339 Charles II Antique Silver Porringer

    £2,950

    A very early English twin handled silver cup with cast serpent form side handles. This little porringer (or caudle cup) combines some of the austere decoration associated with the Commonwealth period with the addition of hand engraved flowers marking the transition into the joyful Restoration period of Charles II. Superb colour. An attractive feature is the decorative base, very reminiscent of sweetmeat dishes of this period. Contains 250ml. Weight 113 grams, 3.6 troy ounces. Diameter 7.7 cm. Height 7cm (to top of handle). London 1662. Maker Edward Treen, specialist cup, porringer and sweetmeat dish maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1673

     

    8394 Charles II Silver Porringer

    £1,750

    A rare early English silver porringer of small size having 2 side handles and belly shape. Lovely original hand beaten finish. Weight 69 grams, 2.2 troy ounces. Height 5.5 cms. Diameter 6 cms. London 1673. Maker IC* listed in Jacksons.

  • Circa 1674

     

    10260 Antique Augsburg Silver Drinking Tot

    £1,650

    A delightful little antique silver cup with a faded gilt patina; having cast foliate side handles and decorative motifs to the lower body. Original bright gilt interior. Contains 70ml. Weight 70 grams, 2.2 troy ounces. Height 6cm. Diameter 5.5cm. Made in Augsburg, Germany. Circa 1674. 17th century.

  • 1675

    Simon Romney

    8739 Antique Charles II Silver Porringer

    £7,500

    A rare piece of early English silver. A large 2 handled antique silver porringer of plain form. The matching cover has a capstan shaped finial so that the lid can be turned upside down and used on its own as a saucer. This has the form of a typical early Restoration porringer, with bellied shape and the lid sitting over the upper rim. There is a small silver support either side next to the handle for the lid to sit on. Hand engraved to the front, and repeated on the cover, are the arms and crest for the Yong family of Medhurst, Sussex. Weight 375 grams, 12 troy ounces. Height 14 cm (total), 10 cm (cup), 4.5 cm (lid). Diameter 10 cm. Spread across the handles 17 cm. London 1675. Makers mark “SR”* in a shield (there are 2 similar marks in Jacksons, see page 124 and 129, bottom of the page), probably Simon Romney.

  • 1680

    John Ruslen

    10242 Charles II Antique Silver Tankard

    £7,750

    A good early English silver lidded tankard with the flat top design of the period and a scroll handle with decorative thumb piece. Large size. To the front is a crisp hand engraved armorial capped by the crest of a lion holding a serpent and with a motto below – for the Leche family. There is an owl crest engraved to the lid. An excellent example of early hand beaten silver with lots of character. Contains 1450 ml. Weight 852 grams, 27.3 troy ounces. Height 18 cm. Spread 21.3 cm. London 1680. Maker “IR” (see Jacksons page 130), probably John Ruslen (see David Mitchell’s “Silversmiths in Elizabethan and Stuart London”.

  • 1680

    Thomas Cory

    9904 Charles II Silver Bowl

    £2,850

    An early English silver side handled porringer (or bleeding bowl) of plain circular form and shallow bellied shape. Small proportions and very charming with the original hand beaten finish. A useful serving bowl, handy for nuts and sweets.The handle is prick marked “I*C 1681 M”. Weight 104 grams, 3.3 troy ounces. Diameter 10.4cm. Height 3.6 cm. Spread 15.4cm. London 1680. Maker Thomas Cory. Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1680

    Johann Hoffler

    10110 Antique Nurnberg Silver Beaker

    £1,250

    A good quality antique silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form and plain style, the body with simulated dotted texture. Simple shape with concentric double ribbed detail to the top. Original light gilt interior. Contain 220ml. Weight 122 grams, 3.9 troy ounces. Height 9cm. Diameter 7cm (top), 5.5cm (base). German silver marks for Nurnberg. Maker Johann Offler. Circa 1680.

  • 1683

    Francis Singleton

    10203 Charles II Antique Silver Peg Tankard

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    Extremely rare. An unusual early English silver peg tankard, flat lidded, with a vertical row of six pegs inside. Good patina. Lovely plain design and beaten silver. To the front there is a contemporary family armorial within a large cartouche. Contains 1,300 ml. Weight 802 grams, 25.7 troy ounces. Height 17cm (to top of thumb piece). Diameter 13.2cm (top), 13.2cm (base). London 1683. Maker Francis Singleton. Sterling silver

  • 1683

    St John Hoyte

    10287 Charles II Antique Silver Tankard

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    A rare example of early English chinoiserie silver. A finely engraved tankard with the flat hinged lid and s scroll handle typical of the period. Large size and good heavy weight. The body and lid are beautifully hand chased with a fantastical Chinese landscape containing long tailed birds and spidery plants. To the front there is an extraordinary bridge with a coiled snake or rope below. Contains 1500 ml. Weight 982 grams, 31.5 troy ounces. Height 18.6cm (to top of thumb piece). Spread 21cm. Diameter 12.3cm (top). London 1683. Maker St John Hoyte. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1684

     

    10247 Charles II Antique Silver Mug

    £4,750

    A rare early English silver mug of plain form. The body is raised from sheet and has a simple strap handle and an incised, reeded neck. This is the earliest type of mug. Contains 520ml. Weight 210 grams, 6.7 troy ounces. Height 16cm. Diameter 7.7cm. Spread across handle 13.2cm. London 1684. Makers mark “PM” start above and below (see Jacksons Page 138). Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1686

    Thomas Cooper

    9938 James II Antique Silver Tankard

    £7,950

    A fine and rare early English sterling silver tankard with a flat hinged cover. Excellent size and quality. Good patina. With a scroll handle, decorative thumb piece and shield shaped terminal. A fabulous collector’s piece and still able to be used. To the front is a crisp armorial hand engraved within plumage feathers, in keeping with the period. An excellent example of early hand beaten silver with lots of character. Contains 1400 ml. Weight 731 grams, 23.5 troy ounces. Height 15.3cm, 17.5cm (to top of thumbpiece). Diameter 12cm (top), 13.5cm (base). Spread 20.5cm. London 1686. Maker “TC, a fish above” probably Thomas Cooper, attributed by David Mitchell. Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1690

    Johann Wagner

    9889 German Silver Beaker

    £1,650

    A good quality antique silver stipple ground beaker of tapering form. Plain style and simple shape. Punched snakeskin ornament. Gilt finish. Contains 240 ml. Weight 134 grams, 4.3 troy ounces. Height 8.8cm. Diameter 7.2cm. German silver marks (assay scrape and the pineapple Augsburg town mark). Maker Johann Wagner. Circa 1690.

  • Circa 1690

    Katherine Mangy

    10186 William and Mary Antique Hull Silver Tumbler Cup

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    A rare item of English provincial silver from Hull in the North of England. An antique silver tumbler cup of simple plain design. Good gauge silver and excellent patina. The round and weighted base allows the cup to stay upright when knocked from side to side. This example, typical of Hull silver tumblers, has a flatter base than those made in London. To the front is a hand engraved armorial with a badger crest for the Brooke family. To the reverse are owner’s initials “AD to IS”.  Contains  170 ml. Weight  116 grams, 3.7 troy ounces. Height 5.4cm. Diameter 7.3cm. Hull circa 1690. Maker Kath Mangy (Jacksons page 473). Sterling silver.

  • Circa 1690

    William Gamble

    10293 William and Mary Antique Silver Beaker

    £2,750

    An early English silver cup with plain tapering sides and rounded base. Contains 350ml. Weight 147 grams, 4.7 troy ounces. Height 9.2cm. Diameter 8.5 (top), 6cm (base). Maker William Gamble. Circa 1690. Sterling silver. 17th century.

  • 1692

    John Richardson

    9890 William and Mary Chinoiserie Silver Beaker

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    An early English antique silver beaker of plain tapering design with simple foot wires. Dating from the late 1600’s. Compact size. Charmingly decorated with a band of hand chased decoration of birds and foliage in the Chinese style known as “chinoiserie”. To the front there is a hand engraved prick dot design containing “F.S” and the date 1693. Excellent patina and hand beaten finish. Contains 160 ml. Weight 74 grams, 2.3 troy ounces. Height 8.1 cm. Diameter 7.2cm. London 1692. Maker John Richardson, a prominent cup and tankard maker known for chinoiserie silver. Sterling silver.

  • 1692

    John Cruttall

    10355 William and Mary Antique Silver Mug

    £3,350

    A charming piece of chinoiserie silver. A rare early antique silver tankard of straight sided form with bands of reed to the top and a simple strap handle. Small size. The hand engraved decoration has a naive oriental scene incorporating Chinese people and exotic birds. To the front is a vacant cartouche with intertwined foliage. Contains 160ml. Weight 280g, 9 troy oz. Height 8.8cm. Diameter 7.4cm (top). London 1692. Maker John Cruttall. Sterling silver.

  • 1693

    George Manjoy

    9539 William & Mary Antique Silver Miniature Mug

    £2,350

    A delightful little collector’s piece. This rare miniature (or toy) mug is an exact copy of a full size original. Of globular form it has a reeded and incised neck, and double scroll handle. This style was only made for a short period at the end of the 17th century and is the earliest type of mug you are likely to come across. The body is engraved with an exotic bird and leafy branches. Weight 14 grams, less than 1/2 troy ounce. Height 3.5cm. Spread 4.9cm. London 1693. Maker George Manjoy, a specialist toy maker.

  • 1694

    John Cory

    9987 William & Mary Antique Silver Childs Mug

    £3,350

    A charming little early English silver mug of plain form. Charming small size and suitable for a child/christening mug. The body is raised from sheet and has a simple strap handle and an incised, reeded neck. This is the earliest type of mug. Engraved to the underside are owner’s initials and the date “1695”. Contains 140 ml. Weight 60 grams, 1.9 troy ounces. Height 6.5cm, 7cm to top of handle. Diameter 5cm. Mark “I.C” in a shield with a pellet below. Possibly John Cory. London 1694. Sterling silver.

  • 1697

    John Sutton

    9860 William III Silver Tankard

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    Outstanding quality and unusually large quart size. A rare early English silver flat top lidded tankard in Britannia standard silver with a scroll handle and decorative thumb piece. To the front is a large hand engraved armorial capped by the crest of a griffin. To the top of the handle there is a set of prick engraved owners initials. An excellent example of early hand beaten silver with lots of character.Contains 2500 ml, a hefty quart capacity (1 quart = 2 pints). Weight 1420 grams, 45.6 troy ounces. Height 23 cm (to top of thumbpiece). Spread 25 cm. London 1697. Maker John Sutton.

  • 1697

     

    9990 William III Antique Silver Cup

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    A very unusual antique silver chocolate cup of tapering form on a small applied foot; the simple “S” scroll handle having a beaded rat-tail decoration. The body has four panels of hand applied matting work. This rare little cup was made for drinking hot chocolate, the newly discovered drinking beverage popular c.1680-1720 – see the coloured illustration. Contains 155ml. Weight 108 grams, 3.4 troy ounces. Height 7.7cm. Diameter of top 7.2cm. Spread across the handle 9cm. London 1697. Maker unknown.

  • 1698

    John Smithsend

    10338 Antique William III Silver Bleeding Bowl

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    An early English silver side handled porringer or bleeding bowl of plain circular form. Britannia standard silver*. Very charming with the shaped pierced handle and original hand beaten finish. Hand engraved to the front is an armorial within plumage feathers, typical of the period, and there is a crest to the handle. Weight 253 grams, 8.1 troy ounces. Diameter 13.5 cm. Height 5.4 cm. Spread 20.5 cm. London 1698. Maker John Smithsend. Britannia standard silver 95.8% pure.

  • 1701

    Seth Lofthouse

    10234 William III Antique Silver Tankard

    £6,500

    A good early English silver flat lidded tankard. Britannia standard silver*. Lovely plain design and hand beaten silver. The tankard has a simple straight sided form and S scroll handle finishing in a decorative thumb piece with shell decoration. Hand engraved to the front there is a large decorative cartouche containing an armorial. Good patina. An interesting feature is the royal stamp for ‘William Rex’ on the reverse side of the body. Contains 1075 ml. Weight 759 grams, 24.3 troy ounces. Height 18 cms (to top of thumb piece). Spread 19cms. Diameter 10.8 cms (top). London 1701. Maker Seth Lofthouse.

  • 1701

    Humphrey Payne

    9599 William III Silver Tankard

    £4,250

    A good early English antique silver tankard with a flat lid. Britannia standard silver*. Lovely plain design and hand beaten silver. The tankard has a simple straight sided form and S scroll handle finishing in a decorative thumb piece. No engravings except the owner’s initials prick engraved to the handle. Contains 900 ml. Weight 624 grams, 20 troy ounces. Height 16.4 cm (to top of thumb piece). Spread 18.5 cms. Diameter 10.5 cms (top). London 1701. Maker Humphrey Payne.

  • 1705

    William Denny

    9945 Queen Anne Antique Silver Tankard

    £7,500

    An extremely large and imposing silver lidded tankard of tapering cylindrical form with a coopered band to the body. Britannia standard silver*. The embossed vertical fluting and bands of hand chased matted decoration are typical of the period. To the front is a hand engraved armorial within a large decorative cartouche. An unusual feature is the double thumb piece which attaches to both the handle and the lid. The handle has engraved owner’s initials. Good patina. Contains 1750 ml. Weight 1325 grams, 42.6 troy ounces. Height 21.2cm (to top of thumb piece). Diameter 12.8cm (top). Spread 23cm. London 1705. Maker William Denny.

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