waxantiques

Coasters / Bottle Holders

Wine coasters were not made until the 1760’s when they were produced from pierced sheet similar to the cake baskets of that date. These silver wine bottle or decanter holders, were usually made in pairs, sometimes fours, but it is rare to find an antique set longer than four. The silver hallmarks were often stamped on the edge of the base and as a result the marks can sometimes be difficult to read, either because they were badly struck or because, over the years, they have become rubbed. “The early name for such pieces was a ‘stand’ or ‘slider’; the term ‘coaster’, first recognized in 1887, was derived from the custom that, after finishing dinner, the cloth was removed from the table, the ladies withdrew, and the bottle of port was ‘coasted’ around the table by the men.” G. Bernard Hughes – ‘Old English Wine Coasters’ .

Bottle holders normally come in two distinct forms. The basket shape allows the bottle to be laid on its side ready for pouring. The upright stand has a handle and is usually adjustable in height; it’s often suitable for both wine and champagne bottles.

Decanter Wagons make a decorative addition to the dining table. These have two silver bottle coasters mounted onto a 2 wheeled frame which can be moved up and down the table.

The Jolly Boat is a special type of decanter wagon normally used on board ship in the naval officers’ dining room. It was customary at the table after pouring wine or spirit from the decanter, to return it to the stand and push it along to the next officer. It is believed that the saying ‘to push the boat out’ has its origins in the custom as the officer paying for the wine was the first to start the jolly boat off round the table. Jolly boat wine coasters were sometimes supplied with wheeled carriages, supposedly for use ashore. At sea, these were dispensed allowing the flat-bottomed coasters to provide the necessary stability aboard a rolling ship.

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Coasters / Bottle Holders

Wine coasters were not made until the 1760’s when they were produced from pierced sheet similar to the cake baskets of that date. These silver wine bottle or decanter holders, were usually made in pairs, sometimes fours, but it is rare to find an antique set longer than four. The silver hallmarks were often stamped on the edge of the base and as a result the marks can sometimes be difficult to read, either because they were badly struck or because, over the years, they have become rubbed. “The early name for such pieces was a ‘stand’ or ‘slider’; the term ‘coaster’, first recognized in 1887, was derived from the custom that, after finishing dinner, the cloth was removed from the table, the ladies withdrew, and the bottle of port was ‘coasted’ around the table by the men.” G. Bernard Hughes – ‘Old English Wine Coasters’ .

Bottle holders normally come in two distinct forms. The basket shape allows the bottle to be laid on its side ready for pouring. The upright stand has a handle and is usually adjustable in height; it’s often suitable for both wine and champagne bottles.

Decanter Wagons make a decorative addition to the dining table. These have two silver bottle coasters mounted onto a 2 wheeled frame which can be moved up and down the table.

The Jolly Boat is a special type of decanter wagon normally used on board ship in the naval officers’ dining room. It was customary at the table after pouring wine or spirit from the decanter, to return it to the stand and push it along to the next officer. It is believed that the saying ‘to push the boat out’ has its origins in the custom as the officer paying for the wine was the first to start the jolly boat off round the table. Jolly boat wine coasters were sometimes supplied with wheeled carriages, supposedly for use ashore. At sea, these were dispensed allowing the flat-bottomed coasters to provide the necessary stability aboard a rolling ship.

  • 1771

    Thomas Nash

    6027 George III Silver Wine Coasters

    £950

    A pretty pair of antique sterling silver coasters with pierced decorative gallery and gadroon borders. There is an engraved crest to the front of each. With turned hardwood bases. Diameter 11.75 cms. Height 3.5 cms. London 1771. Maker probably Thomas Nash.

  • 1777

    Robert Hennell I

    9881 George III Silver Wine Coasters

    Sold

    A very pretty pair of antique silver bottle stands with pierced silver borders and solid hardwood centres. Simple elegant design with bead borders, foliate swags and classical motifs. To the front there an oval cartouche containing the letter “F” engraved. Height 3.4cm. Diameter 12cm. London 1777. Maker Robert Hennell I. Sterling silver.

  • 1787

     

    10100 George III Antique Silver Coasters

    £950

    A very pretty pair of antique sterling silver wine coasters with pierced gallery and turned hardwood centres. Typical 18th century classical  design. The borders having bright cut engraving with swags and an oval medallion to the front. Height 3.3cm. Diameter 12cm. London 1787/8. Maker’s mark rubbed.

  • 1813

     

    9527 George III Silver Coaster

    £550

    A classic antique sterling silver wine bottle stand with elegant plain styling. Hand engraved crest to the front. Turned hardwood base. Diameter 12 cm. Height 3.4 cms. London 1798 or 1813. Maker’s mark rubbed.

  • 1832 - 1836

    Howard & Hawkesworth

    9932 Antique Silver Wine Coasters

    Sold

    A substantial pair of antique silver wine bottle holders with turned hardwood bases and central button. The tall gallery and borders has grape and vine leaf ornamentation. Large size; suitable for a champagne bottle. One of the central buttons is engraved with the initial “D”. Diameter 14cm (outside). Height 6.5cm. Sheffield 1832/36. Maker Howard & Hawkesworth. Sterling silver.

  • 1861

    George Angell

    8658 Antique Silver Model Chariot and Horses

    £6,750

    An outstanding piece of decorative silver. An antique sterling silver pair of galloping horses pulling a wheeled chariot. All mounted on a heavy solid silver base with naturalistic decoration, standing on four turned wooden feet. Excellent quality and good heavy weight. Probably it is just a decorative piece however the chariot could possibly be used for serving – the shape isn’t suitable for holding a bottle (see photo). Weight 1506 grams, 48.4 troy ounces. Height 15.5 cms. Base 33 x 16 cms. London 1861. Maker George Angell

  • Circa 1900

    Grachev Brothers

    9946 Russian Antique Silver Tray

    £2,750

    A stylish antique silver drinks tray of sleek, geometric form. Will hold up 6 bottles of champagne. Excellent quality and heavy gauge silver. Engraved to the front and rear with a monogram in cursive script. Weight 1540 grams, 49.5 troy ounces. Length 36cm. Width 27cm. Height 5.5cm. Maker Grachev Brothers, St Petersburg. Retailed by G. Keller, Paris. Circa 1900.

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