waxantiques

Cutlery

Before the 18th century the only items of table silver made in any quantity were spoons. Plates and knives were set on the table, food was cut with the knife and eaten with one’s personal spoon (or fingers). Silver forks were introduced from France in the mid 17th century but are rare prior to the 18th century. It is unusual to find sets of table silver dating earlier than the late 18th century.

The hallmarks on pre 1780 table silver are often squashed and distorted. At that time the silver marks used to be struck on the thin part of the stem which distorted the form of the piece and required the silversmith to hammer the piece back into shape. From c.1780 onwards the Assay Office stamped table silver near the top of the stem as opposed to on the stem just below the bowl, and hallmarks are generally much clearer because there is more space on which to strike them.

Canteens of Antique Silver Cutlery
Table silver was made in sets from circa 1690 onwards but did not come into popular use until the late 18th century when fashionable hosts started to lay their tables with a matching set of cutlery and flatware for their guests. Boxed sets were displayed on the sideboard and could be carried to other family residences. They became popular wedding presents when mass production made them affordable in the 1900s. Nowadays these complete sets of cutlery are generally sold without a fitted box or table. The word canteen remains in use describing an area for communal dining.

Mother of Pearl Cutlery
In the late 19th century sets of cutlery and serving pieces with real mother of pearl handles became popular. They are often found in their original fitted boxes and make attractive wedding gifts. Cutlery handles made from real mother of pearl shell occasionally have a slight variation in grain and size.

Knives – Silver Handled Knives, Skewers and Carving Sets. The word “cutlery” is used generically today to describe all knives, forks and spoons however it was originally used solely for knives and other related cutting instruments. The origin of the word “cutlery” comes from the old French word “coutelier. By the 18th century the provincial English town of Sheffield had become an international centre of the cutlery industry making knives with hollow silver handles that were stamped in two halves, soldered together and inserted with a steel knife blade. Nowadays the original steel blades are often replaced with stainless steel blades which are easier to maintain.

Spoons and Forks –
Collectors Spoons, Dinner, Soup and Dessert Spoons, Serving Spoons.
Tea, Coffee, Salt and Mustard Spoons
Caddy Spoons, Marrow Spoons, Mote Spoons

Before the 18th century the only items of table silver made in any quantity were spoons. Early English silver spoons can date from as early as the 15th century and are highly collectible, especially spoons by rare makers and from unusual provincial towns. The most popular form of cast terminal was the seal top spoon, named after the circular disc at the top, which often bore the engraved initials of the owners. Lion sejant spoons and apostle spoons were also common from the 15th century to the beginning of the 17th century. From the late 16th century the plain flattened stem of the slip top spoon was introduced which developed during the 17th century into the popular trefid form.

Forks. Silver Dinner and Dessert Forks are rare before the 18th century and are not often found in sets until the late 1700s.

The Sucket Fork is an implement with a teaspoon bowl at one end and a two pronged fork at the other. Very rare and only produced from the late 17th century until the early 18th century.

Serving Pieces –
Serving Spoons, Basting Spoons, Ladles,
Serving Slices, Asparagus Tongs, Grape Shears, Sugar Nips
As formal table silverware developed during the 18th century many different forms of serving pieces were introduced with very specific functions.
Long handled serving spoons have been in use since c.1680 and the early spoons had tubular handles. These are usually termed as basting or stuffing spoons; the earliest super large size is termed as a hash spoon
Punch ladles were introduced in the early 1700’s and differ from other ladles in the fact that they have turned wood or twisted whalebone handles. Originally they had round bowls which were superseded in about 1735 by egg shaped bowls. Later on lips were added and after 1760 they were often inset with silver coins.Silver soup and sauce ladles date from George II period and later.
The first fish slice, made in circa 1740, originally had a triangular blade and these are now highly sought after to serve cake and pastries.
Asparagus servers with a serrated blade and chop tongs date from the end of the 18th century.
Grape shears are not found until the 19th century. These are often in presentation boxes and can have beautiful grapevine decoration.
Caddy spoons for measuring out tea leaves were made from 1780 onwards.

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Cutlery

Before the 18th century the only items of table silver made in any quantity were spoons. Plates and knives were set on the table, food was cut with the knife and eaten with one’s personal spoon (or fingers). Silver forks were introduced from France in the mid 17th century but are rare prior to the 18th century. It is unusual to find sets of table silver dating earlier than the late 18th century.

The hallmarks on pre 1780 table silver are often squashed and distorted. At that time the silver marks used to be struck on the thin part of the stem which distorted the form of the piece and required the silversmith to hammer the piece back into shape. From c.1780 onwards the Assay Office stamped table silver near the top of the stem as opposed to on the stem just below the bowl, and hallmarks are generally much clearer because there is more space on which to strike them.

Canteens of Antique Silver Cutlery
Table silver was made in sets from circa 1690 onwards but did not come into popular use until the late 18th century when fashionable hosts started to lay their tables with a matching set of cutlery and flatware for their guests. Boxed sets were displayed on the sideboard and could be carried to other family residences. They became popular wedding presents when mass production made them affordable in the 1900s. Nowadays these complete sets of cutlery are generally sold without a fitted box or table. The word canteen remains in use describing an area for communal dining.

Mother of Pearl Cutlery
In the late 19th century sets of cutlery and serving pieces with real mother of pearl handles became popular. They are often found in their original fitted boxes and make attractive wedding gifts. Cutlery handles made from real mother of pearl shell occasionally have a slight variation in grain and size.

Knives – Silver Handled Knives, Skewers and Carving Sets. The word “cutlery” is used generically today to describe all knives, forks and spoons however it was originally used solely for knives and other related cutting instruments. The origin of the word “cutlery” comes from the old French word “coutelier. By the 18th century the provincial English town of Sheffield had become an international centre of the cutlery industry making knives with hollow silver handles that were stamped in two halves, soldered together and inserted with a steel knife blade. Nowadays the original steel blades are often replaced with stainless steel blades which are easier to maintain.

Spoons and Forks –
Collectors Spoons, Dinner, Soup and Dessert Spoons, Serving Spoons.
Tea, Coffee, Salt and Mustard Spoons
Caddy Spoons, Marrow Spoons, Mote Spoons

Before the 18th century the only items of table silver made in any quantity were spoons. Early English silver spoons can date from as early as the 15th century and are highly collectible, especially spoons by rare makers and from unusual provincial towns. The most popular form of cast terminal was the seal top spoon, named after the circular disc at the top, which often bore the engraved initials of the owners. Lion sejant spoons and apostle spoons were also common from the 15th century to the beginning of the 17th century. From the late 16th century the plain flattened stem of the slip top spoon was introduced which developed during the 17th century into the popular trefid form.

Forks. Silver Dinner and Dessert Forks are rare before the 18th century and are not often found in sets until the late 1700s.

The Sucket Fork is an implement with a teaspoon bowl at one end and a two pronged fork at the other. Very rare and only produced from the late 17th century until the early 18th century.

Serving Pieces –
Serving Spoons, Basting Spoons, Ladles,
Serving Slices, Asparagus Tongs, Grape Shears, Sugar Nips
As formal table silverware developed during the 18th century many different forms of serving pieces were introduced with very specific functions.
Long handled serving spoons have been in use since c.1680 and the early spoons had tubular handles. These are usually termed as basting or stuffing spoons; the earliest super large size is termed as a hash spoon
Punch ladles were introduced in the early 1700’s and differ from other ladles in the fact that they have turned wood or twisted whalebone handles. Originally they had round bowls which were superseded in about 1735 by egg shaped bowls. Later on lips were added and after 1760 they were often inset with silver coins.Silver soup and sauce ladles date from George II period and later.
The first fish slice, made in circa 1740, originally had a triangular blade and these are now highly sought after to serve cake and pastries.
Asparagus servers with a serrated blade and chop tongs date from the end of the 18th century.
Grape shears are not found until the 19th century. These are often in presentation boxes and can have beautiful grapevine decoration.
Caddy spoons for measuring out tea leaves were made from 1780 onwards.

  • 1689

     

    9261 Antique Silver Trefid Spoon

    Sold

    A good antique sterling silver spoon, the oval bowl with incised and beaded rat tail heel, the flat stem with a trefid pattern terminal. William & Mary period. Hand hammered finish. Owners initials to the front and back. Weight 51 grams, 1.6 troy ounces. Length 20cm. Bowl 7×4.6cm. Makers mark ‘IL’ over a mullet, within a shield. London 1689.

  • 1728

    James Savage

    9958 George II Antique Silver Serving Spoon

    Sold

    A massive antique sterling silver spoon in the popular Hanover pattern. Very useful long handled serving spoon. To the reverse of the handle terminal there is an intricate hand engraved armorial. Weight 271 grams, 8.7 troy ounces. Length 39.5cm. Bowl 12 x 7cm. London 1728. Maker James Savage. Sterling silver..

  • 1741 - 1757

     

    7624 George II Set of Silver Serving Spoons

    Sold

    A composite set of 11 early English sterling silver spoons in the popular Hanover pattern. Lovely plain style. Each with a hand engraved crest of a dog under a tree. Weight 678 grams, 21.8 troy ounces. Length 20 cms approx. Various dates and makers. 4 spoons by Samuel Robey 1741-1746. 3 spoons by Ebenezer Coker 1753-57. 4 spoons are unreadable.

  • Circa 1750

     

    8965 Antique Silver Spoon

    £450

    An excellent antique Dutch gilt silver spoon, the end of the handle modelled with a seated figure holding a baby and accompanied by a cherub. The back of the bowl is inscribed with the owners initials. Weight 61 grams, just under 3 troy ounces. Length 18.3 cms. Bowl measures 7×5 cms. Stamped with Dutch silver marks for Amsterdam. Circa 1750.

  • 1782

    William Sumner

    9607 Antique Silver Skewer

    £350

    An attractive antique silver meat skewer with decorative ring handle. Can also be used as a letter opener. Uninscribed. Weight 61 grams, 1 troy ounce. Length 24.5 cm. London 1782. Maker probably William Sumner.

  • 1795

    Thomas Wallis I

    9088 Antique Silver Forks

    Sold

    A set of Georgian sterling silver dinner forks for 12 people. In the traditional Old English and thread pattern. All with a hand engraved stag crest. Weight approx 800 grams, 25.7 troy ounces. Length 21cm. London 1795. Maker Thomas Wallis. These match the dinner forks in #9078 Georgian canteen of cutlery.

  • 1798

    William Ely

    9597 Antique Silver Skewer

    £350

    A good quality antique silver meat skewer with ring handle. Can also be used as a letter opener. Uninscribed. Weight 133 grams, 4.2 troy ounces. Length 35 cm. London 1798. Maker William Ely II.

  • Circa 1800

     

    8411 Pair of Antique Continental Silver Spoons

    £185

    An excellent quality pair of antique silver spoons with figural ends depicting a classical lady culminating in a twisted handle possibly resembling a mermaids tail. The gilded bowl is attached with a fruit encrusted mount. These delightful spoons are very heavy and have a chunky feel. Traces of gilding all over. Weight 179 grams, 5.7 troy ounces. Length 18 cms. Marked on the back of the bowl with a hand mark. Probably German. Circa 1800.

  • Circa 1800

    Joseph Taylor

    9856 George III Silver Caddy Spoon

    £235

    A charming little antique silver spoon with wire scroll handle, the bowl fashioned as a leaf. Weight 8 grams. Length 7cm. Width 3cm. Lion mark only. This type of spoon was generally made in Birmingham. Maker probably Joseph Taylor. Circa 1800.

  • 1806

    Arthur Murphy

    7098 Antique Irish Silver Skewer

    £235

    A good quality antique Dublin silver meat skewer with ring handle and hand engraved crest to one end. Could be used as a letter opener.. Weight 81 grams, 2.6 troy ounces. Length 31 cm. Dublin 1806. Maker Arthur Murphy.

  • 1812 - 1815

    Eley‚ Fearn & Chawner

    9254 Canteen of Georgian Silver Cutlery for 12

    Sold

    An extensive set of antique sterling silver cutlery for 12 people. 84 pieces. Very elegant fiddle, thread and shell pattern. Together with a full set of vintage sterling silver knives. The flatware all has a hand engraved crest of an elephant. Weight excluding knives 3288 grams, 105.7 troy ounces. Flatware all by Eley Fearn & Chawner London 1812 (except the 12 dessert forks London 1815, no makers mark). Knives by Vanders, Sheffield 1982.

  • 1829

    Jonathan Hayne

    7273 Antique Silver Skewer

    £275

    A good quality antique silver meat skewer with ring handle and hand engraved crest to one end. Suitable for use as a paper knife. Weight 96 grams, 3 troy ounces. Length 32.5 cms. London 1829. Maker Jonathan Hayne.

  • 1834 - 1838

    Mary Chawner

    9742 Antique Canteen of Cutlery

    Sold

    A handsome set of antique sterling silver cutlery for 12 people. 60 pieces. Very elegant fiddle, thread and shell pattern. Total weight excluding knives 4314 grams, 138.7 troy ounces. Flatware all by Mary Chawner London 1834/5 (except 2 dinner forks London 1838). Sterling silver.

  • 1836

     

    9547 Antique Silver Caddy Spoon

    £225

    A pretty little Victorian sterling silver caddy spoon with a square fluted bowl and shaped handle. Pretty bright cut engraved decoration. Weight 7 grams. Length 8 cms. Birmingham 1887. Maker James Collins.

  • 1837

    Mary Chawner

    9827 Antique Silver Asparagus Tongs

    Sold

    An elegant pair of antique silver asparagus serving tongs with decorative pierced silver ends. Plain classic thread design which will compliment most cutlery patterns. Weight 203 grams, 6.5 troy ounces. Length 26cm. Width 3.2cm. London 1837. Maker Mary Chawner. Sterling silver.

  • 1844

    John James Whiting

    9561 Antique Silver Basting Spoon

    £195

    An antique sterling silver spoon in the popular fiddle pattern. Very useful long handled serving spoon. Initials “EN” engraved to one end in old fashioned script. Weight 134 grams, 4.3 troy ounces. Length 30.5 cm. London 1844. Maker John Whiting.

  • 1850

    Aaron Hadfield

    9908 Antique Silver and Mother of Pearl Cutlery

    £1,250

    A large set of 18 knives and 18 forks with elegant plain styled silver blades. Dessert cutlery. The real mother of pearl handles have ornate silver ferules with cross hatch decoration. Engraved to each handle is a boars head crest. Original solid wood box with blue velvet interior and a pull out tray. Knife 20.8cm. Fork 17cm. Sheffield 1850. Maker Aaron Hadfield. Sterling silver.

  • 1870

    Martin Hall and Co

    9831 Antique Silver and Mother of Pearl Cutlery

    Sold

    A set of 12 knives and 12 forks with pretty blades finely engraved with flower and foliate decoration. The real mother of pearl handles have ornate ferules with bead borders. Original cushion shaped wooden box with blue velvet interior. Knife 22.2cm. Fork 18.3cm. Sheffield 1870. Maker Martin Hall. Sterling silver.

  • 1873

    Henry John Lias

    7858 Victorian Silver Dessert Spoons

    £275

    A set of 6 antique sterling silver spoons in the popular fiddle pattern. Good plain style. Each with an engraved monogram in cursive script. Weight 248 grams, 7.9 troy ounces. All spoons length 17 cms. London 1873. Maker Henry & Henry Lias.

  • 1877

    Barnabas Blackburn

    6009 Victorian Silver Tongs

    £150

    An antique pair of sterling silver tongs beautifully modelled with claw nips.
    Weight 65 grams, 2 troy ounces. Length 14.5 cms. London 1877. Maker Barnabas Blackburn.

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  • 1878

    Henry Holland

    7971 Antique Silver Serving Spoons

    £475

    A superb set of 6 antique sterling silver spoons in the elegant bead pattern. Excellent plain style. Each piece has a hand engraved crest. Total weight, 6 spoons, 435 grams, 13.9 troy ounces. Length 22.5 cms. London 1878. Maker Henry Holland.

  • Circa 1880

    Harrison Brothers & Howson Ltd

    9704 Antique Silver Knives

    Sold

    A set of 8 antique sterling silver knives in the popular Kings pattern with steel blades. 8 dinner knives, length 28cm. The steel blades are marked “Sansom & Sons”. The silver handles are stamped for Sheffield. Circa 1880. Makers stamp “HH” for Harrison Bros & Howsen. Sterling silver.

  • 1896 - 1897

    Francis Higgins

    9262 Antique Silver Canteen of Kings Cutlery

    £2,250

    An excellent set of sterling silver cutlery for 6 people in the popular Kings pattern. Total 31 pieces. Weight 2261 grams, 72.7 troy ounces. All pieces London 1896-7, maker Francis Higgins.

  • 1897

    Allen & Darwin

    9834 Antique Silver and Mother of Pearl Fish Servers

    £495

    An excellent silver serving knife and fork with attractive flower engraving. The real mother of pearl handles are good and chunky and have decorative sterling silver ferules and end caps. All in the original presentation box with green velvet lining. Knife 32.8cm. Fork 26.1cm. Sheffield 1897. Maker Allen & Darwin. Sterling silver.

  • 1906

    Cooper Brothers

    8632 Antique Silver Tea Spoons

    £145

    A good set of 6 antique sterling silver spoons in the attractive feather edge pattern. Total weight 104 grams, 3.3 troy ounces. Length 12.6 cms. Sheffield 1906. Maker Cooper Brothers & Sons Ltd.

  • 1906

    James Deakin & Sons

    9562 Antique Silver Basting Spoon

    £195

    An antique sterling silver spoon in the classic Old English pattern. Very useful long handled serving spoon. Initials “B” engraved to one end in old fashioned script. Weight 166 grams, 5.3 troy ounces. Length 31.5 cm. Sheffield 1906. Maker John and William Deakin.

  • Circa 1912

    Wakely & Wheeler

    7080 Antique Silver Grape Scissors

    £245

    An elegant pair of sterling silver grape shears in the original velvet lined box. Very smart plain design. Weight 77 grams, 2.4 troy ounces. Length 7 cm. London 1912. Maker Wakeley & Wheeler.

  • 1925

    Spink & Son

    9387 Vintage Silver Knives

    £550

    A set of sterling silver knives with stainless steel blades. Smart plain styled handles with shell shaped ends. 6 dinner knives, length 25.8 cm, and 6 dessert knives, length 22.6 cm. London 1925. Maker Spink & Son.

  • 1927

    William Hutton

    9996 George V Silver Egg Cutter

    Sold

    A rare sterling silver boiled egg topper complete with a full set of teeth. Ready to cut off the top from a soft-boiled egg. An unusual and very practical conversation piece. It would make a splendid gift. Weight 51 grams, 1.6 troy ounces. Length 10cm. Width across the handle 5.4cm. Sheffield 1927. Maker William Hutton & Sons. Sterling silver.

  • 1927

    Charles Boynton

    10105 Vintage Silver Knives for 12

    £750

    A good set of 12 silver handled dinner and dessert knives with stainless steel blades. Smart plain styled handles. Each has a decorative monogram in distinctive lettering. The dinner knives have spatula shaped blades and the dessert knives have pointed blades. The silver handles are unfilled. Length 25/21.5cm. Sheffield 1927. Maker Charles Boyton & Son Ltd.

  • 2001 - 2005

     

    9804 Art Deco Silver Knives

    £495

    A vintage set of 12 silver knives with stainless steel blades. Art deco design with solid silver geometric style, plain handles. Stainless steel blades. 6 dinner knives and 6 dessert knives. Sheffield 2001/2/5. Various makers. Sterling silver.

  • 2002

    United Cutlery

    9798 Art Deco Silver Knives

    £495

    A vintage set of 12 silver knives with stainless steel blades. Art deco design with sterling silver geometric style, plain handles. The stainless steel blades have the United Cutlery logo. 6 dinner knives, length 24cm, and 6 dessert knives, length 21.5cm. Sheffield 2002. Maker United Cutlery. Sterling silver.

    Other matching sets available #9801 and #9804

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