waxantiques

David Willaume II

David Willaume I, Huguenot maker, born 7 June 1658, son of Adam Willaume, goldsmith of Metz on the Pont des Morts. His first mention in London was in 1686 at the Windsor Castle, Charing Cross. Married Marie Mettayer 1690. Free 1693/94 as David Williams. First mark as largeworker undate probably 1697. Second and third marks 1719. His children were Anne, born 1691, wife of David Tanqueray, David, born 1693, and Adam and Suzanne, born 1694 and 1696, died in infancy. Willaume seems to have retired about 1728 (when David II entered a mark of distinctly different type to his father) and he purchased the Manor of Tingrith, Bedfordshire. Died circa 1741.
David Willaume I was an important silversmith and enjoyed the patronage of the wealthiest clients in England. His many outstanding pieces display the highest qualities of rich design and impeccable execution. Among his impressive list of important works are the magnificent pair of wine coolers (Duke of Devonshire), the Luton Hoo toilet service, the pair of ivory mounted vases (British Museum), and the punchbowl and cover (Trinity Hall, Cambridge).
David Willaume II, apprenticed to his father the master Hugeunot silversmith David Willaume I in 1707, free 1723. First and 2nd marks entered as largeworker in 1728, roughly the time of his father’s retirement. 3rd mark 1739. He became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1737. Goldsmith to the King 1744 and 1746. Died 1761.

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David Willaume II

David Willaume I, Huguenot maker, born 7 June 1658, son of Adam Willaume, goldsmith of Metz on the Pont des Morts. His first mention in London was in 1686 at the Windsor Castle, Charing Cross. Married Marie Mettayer 1690. Free 1693/94 as David Williams. First mark as largeworker undate probably 1697. Second and third marks 1719. His children were Anne, born 1691, wife of David Tanqueray, David, born 1693, and Adam and Suzanne, born 1694 and 1696, died in infancy. Willaume seems to have retired about 1728 (when David II entered a mark of distinctly different type to his father) and he purchased the Manor of Tingrith, Bedfordshire. Died circa 1741.
David Willaume I was an important silversmith and enjoyed the patronage of the wealthiest clients in England. His many outstanding pieces display the highest qualities of rich design and impeccable execution. Among his impressive list of important works are the magnificent pair of wine coolers (Duke of Devonshire), the Luton Hoo toilet service, the pair of ivory mounted vases (British Museum), and the punchbowl and cover (Trinity Hall, Cambridge).
David Willaume II, apprenticed to his father the master Hugeunot silversmith David Willaume I in 1707, free 1723. First and 2nd marks entered as largeworker in 1728, roughly the time of his father’s retirement. 3rd mark 1739. He became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1737. Goldsmith to the King 1744 and 1746. Died 1761.

  • 1749

    David Willaume II

    10146 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

    £5,950

    An excellent quality pair of antique silver candlesticks of baluster design with shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. Each is hand engraved within the well of the base with an insignia containing the royal motto. Weight 1171 grams, 37.6 troy ounces. Height 20cm. Bases 12cm square. London 1749. Maker David Willaume II. Sterling silver.

  • 1730

    David Willaume II

    8772 George II Antique Silver Candlesticks

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    A fine pair of antique sterling silver candlesticks with baluster stems and shaped bases. Heavy cast silver and good original colour. Weight 931 grams, 29.9 troy ounces. Height 19 cms. Bases 11 cms square. London 1730. Maker David Willaume II.

  • 1731

    David Willaume II

    9426 George II Antique Silver Salver

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    An attractive antique sterling silver tazza of plain form on a spreading foot. Lovely simple styling typical of the period. Dainty size. Weight 221 grams, 7.1 troy ounces. Height 4cm. Diameter 15cm. London 1731. Maker David Willaume II.

  • 1732

    David Willaume II

    9458 George II Silver Salver

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    A rare antique sterling silver salver of oval form with a cast border of rope and shell ornament. Fine quality and heavy weight. The centre has a hand engraved armorial with mottos “Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense” and “Stat Religione”. Oval salvers are not generally found the second half of the 18th century. Weight 672 grams, 21.6 troy ounces. Height 4cm. Top measures 26x19cm. London 1732. Maker David Willaume II.
    with a cast border of rope and shell ornament. Fine quality and heavy weight. The centre has a hand engraved armorial with mottos “Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense” and “Stat Religione”. Oval salvers are not generally found the second half of the 18th century. Weight 672 grams, 21.6 troy ounces. Height 4cm. Top measures 26x19cm. London 1732. Maker David Willaume II.

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