waxantiques

rococo

Rococo, fashionable from about 1730 to 1770, was used primarily in furniture, silver and ceramics. The style takes its name from the French rocaille (pronounced ‘rock-eye’), which means the rock or broken shell motifs which often formed part of the design. Rococo design was developed by craftspeople and designers rather than architects which helps to explain the importance of hand-worked decoration. The natural flowing design is often not symmetrical – one half of the design does not match the other half. Curved forms, often resembling the letters S and C, are common.

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rococo

Rococo, fashionable from about 1730 to 1770, was used primarily in furniture, silver and ceramics. The style takes its name from the French rocaille (pronounced ‘rock-eye’), which means the rock or broken shell motifs which often formed part of the design. Rococo design was developed by craftspeople and designers rather than architects which helps to explain the importance of hand-worked decoration. The natural flowing design is often not symmetrical – one half of the design does not match the other half. Curved forms, often resembling the letters S and C, are common.

  • 1754 - 1755

    John Café

    10149 George II Antique Silver Candelabra Suite

    £19,500

    Antique silver candelabra from this period are very rare and the additional pair of matching candlesticks add to the splendour of this set. A fine set of two-light silver candelabras of naturalistic rococo design with removable branches, the candlesticks with large hand engraved armorials. The four candlesticks can be used on their own. All pieces are made of heavy cast silver. Weight 4597 grams, 14 troy ounces. Height 42.5cm (top of candelabra), 27.2cm (candlestick). London 1754-55. Maker John Café, specialist candlestick maker. Sterling silver.

  • 1753

    Fuller White

    10155 George II Antique Silver Tea Kettle

    Sold

    A magnificent example of English rococo silver. An antique sterling silver samovar of inverted baluster form with a folding raffia finish handle, the silver lid finial cast in the form of a little merman drinking from a shell, the curved spout finishing in the form of a bird. Superb quality deep chased decoration with shells, flowers and swirls. Hand engraved to the front is a large family armorial and to the reverse a Scottish sporran crest. The matching stand has an ornate cast and pierced frieze with face masks (to match those on the handle), and stands on large shell feet; the integral oil reservoir has a push on top, both with the sporran crest. Weight (including raffia) 2451 grams, 78.8 troy ounces. Total height 39cm. Kettle height 27.5 cm (handle extended), 19 cm (to top of kettle finial). London 1753. Maker Fuller White. Sterling silver.

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