waxantiques

Robert Garrard

George Wickes (1698–1761), London silversmith, founded the business that was to become Garrard. Wickes entered his mark in 1722, moving to Panton Street off Haymarket in central London in 1735 as a goldsmith and provider of jewellery and other luxury items to aristocratic patrons. Wickes, an accomplished silversmith known for his work in the rococo style, gained the patronage of Frederick, Prince of Wales. Two apprentices of Wickes, John Parker and Edward Wakelin, purchased the business on Wickes’ retirement in 1760, replaced by John Wakelin and William Taylor in 1776.

Following the death of William Taylor, Robert Garrard became a partner in 1792 and took sole control of the business in 1802. On his death in 1818, his three eldest sons, Robert Garrard II, James Garrard and Sebastian Garrard took control by trading as R., J. and S. Garrard. James retired in 1835 and the company became R & S Garrard. The company remained in the hands of the Garrard family until the death of Sebastian Henry Garrard, great-grandson of Robert Garrard senior, in 1946. The name Garrard & Company Ltd was registered in 1909, and the company moved to new premises in Albemarle Street in central London in 1911.

In 1843, Queen Victoria appointed Garrard to the position of Crown Jewellers, leading to the production of numerous pieces of silverware and jewellery for the Royal Family, as well as the upkeep of the Crown Jewels.

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Robert Garrard

George Wickes (1698–1761), London silversmith, founded the business that was to become Garrard. Wickes entered his mark in 1722, moving to Panton Street off Haymarket in central London in 1735 as a goldsmith and provider of jewellery and other luxury items to aristocratic patrons. Wickes, an accomplished silversmith known for his work in the rococo style, gained the patronage of Frederick, Prince of Wales. Two apprentices of Wickes, John Parker and Edward Wakelin, purchased the business on Wickes’ retirement in 1760, replaced by John Wakelin and William Taylor in 1776.

Following the death of William Taylor, Robert Garrard became a partner in 1792 and took sole control of the business in 1802. On his death in 1818, his three eldest sons, Robert Garrard II, James Garrard and Sebastian Garrard took control by trading as R., J. and S. Garrard. James retired in 1835 and the company became R & S Garrard. The company remained in the hands of the Garrard family until the death of Sebastian Henry Garrard, great-grandson of Robert Garrard senior, in 1946. The name Garrard & Company Ltd was registered in 1909, and the company moved to new premises in Albemarle Street in central London in 1911.

In 1843, Queen Victoria appointed Garrard to the position of Crown Jewellers, leading to the production of numerous pieces of silverware and jewellery for the Royal Family, as well as the upkeep of the Crown Jewels.

  • 1815

    Robert Garrard

    9356 George III Antique Silver Tea Kettle

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    A magnificent antique sterling silver samovar with hand chased decoration and folding handle with raffia finish. The matching silver tea kettle stand has an ornate cast and pierced frieze with face masks, and stands on large shell feet; the detachable burner has a rise and fall wick. An excellent piece with heavy gauge silver and good colour. Hand engraved to the front is a large hand engraved armorial with the motto “Pro Rege Lege Grege”. To the reverse is the crest of a serpent over a crown, repeated on the kettle stand. Weight 2120 grams, 68.1 troy ounces. Total height 36cm (to top of handle). London 1815. Maker Robert Garrard.

  • Circa 1804

    Robert Garrard

    6215 George III Antique Silver Butter Shells by Robert Garrard

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    A delightful pair of antique sterling silver scallop shell dishes with a crest of an emu engraved to the top of the hand grip. Lovely simple design. Pretty little whelk shell feet. Excellent condition and good gauge silver. Weight 144 grams, 4.6 troy ounces. Each measures 10 x 10.5cm. London 1804. Maker Robert Garrard.

  • 1845

    Robert Garrard

    7534 Antique Silver Dessert Stand by Garrard

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    A magnificent antique sterling silver dumb waiter standing tall with a decorative column mounted with 2 graduated serving plates. Excellent heavy quality and attention to detail as you’d expect from this top quality silver company. The pierced dishes have a broad, peacock tail decorated border which mingles with the inner gothic design. The column is monumental, superbly decorated, and finishes at the base with four protruding lions masks. The heavy circular base repeats the above theme and also has four lions head masks. Weight 2406 grams, 77.3 troy ounces. Height 45cm. Diameter of plates 23/28cm. Every piece marked London 1845. Maker Robert Garrard, appointed crown jewellers to Queen Victoria.

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  • 1764

    Richard Rugg

    8475 George III Silver Salver

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    An excellent quality antique sterling silver salver with a scalloped shell border and scroll feet. Good size. The centre has a double hand engraved crest within a finely executed cartouche depicting an English country garden with trees, flowers, garden architecture, fruit, a swan and much more. Weight 1433 grams, 46 troy ounces. Diameter 37.5 cms. Height 3.5 cms. London 1764. Maker Richard Rugg.

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