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Hunt & Roskell

Hunt & Roskell, a renowned jewellers and silversmiths on Bond Street, London, held the Royal Warrant of Queen Victoria for many years. The firm was the successor to the celebrated silversmith Paul Storr who had left Rundell, Bridge & Rundell to set up his own workshop on Harrison Street near Clerkenwell in 1819. A couple of years later he went into partnership with John Mortimer and began trading from 13 New Bond Street as Storr & Mortimer. In 1826 they took John Samuel Hunt as partner, who brought a welcome investment capital of £5,000 with him. The firm was increasingly successful and in 1838 they moved to new premises at 156 New Bond Street. Paul Storr retired at the end of that same year and the name changed to Mortimer and Hunt operating from 1839-1843.

On John Mortimer’s retirement in 1843 the business became Hunt & Roskell, the partners being John Samuel Hunt, his son John Hunt, Robert Roskell Jn. (son of pocket watchmaker Robert Roskell from Liverpool) and Charles Frederick Hancock. The firm grew in size and prosperity creating wonderful pieces of silverware from tea and coffee pots, salvers and candelabra through to presentation plates and cups as well as ornate and decorative table centre pieces. Their jewellery was equally impressive. They exhibited at the Great Exhibition held in 1851 at the Crystal Palace, London and were granted the Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria. Further exhibitions followed both at home and abroad including New York in 1853 and Paris in 1867. By the 1860’s they were reported to be employing 35 people at the New Bond Street shop and a further 80-100 at the factory on Harrison Street. They also worked in collaboration with a large number of additional craftspeople as well as retailing both jewellery and silver from other workshops such as that of Carlo Giuliano and Robert Hennell. The business continued successfully and Robert Roskell’s son Allan and John Hunt’s son John Mortimer Hunt joined in the firm. After the death of John Hunt in 1879, his son and the two Messrs Roskells continued in partnership until 1888 when Allan Roskell and John Mortimer Hunt took over the business between them. In 1889 the partnership was dissolved and the business was sold to J.W. Benson of Ludgate Hill who kept the name and continued trading under Hunt & Roskell until 1897 when it was converted into a limited company Hunt & Roskell Ltd which remained trading until the 1960s.

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Hunt & Roskell

Hunt & Roskell, a renowned jewellers and silversmiths on Bond Street, London, held the Royal Warrant of Queen Victoria for many years. The firm was the successor to the celebrated silversmith Paul Storr who had left Rundell, Bridge & Rundell to set up his own workshop on Harrison Street near Clerkenwell in 1819. A couple of years later he went into partnership with John Mortimer and began trading from 13 New Bond Street as Storr & Mortimer. In 1826 they took John Samuel Hunt as partner, who brought a welcome investment capital of £5,000 with him. The firm was increasingly successful and in 1838 they moved to new premises at 156 New Bond Street. Paul Storr retired at the end of that same year and the name changed to Mortimer and Hunt operating from 1839-1843.

On John Mortimer’s retirement in 1843 the business became Hunt & Roskell, the partners being John Samuel Hunt, his son John Hunt, Robert Roskell Jn. (son of pocket watchmaker Robert Roskell from Liverpool) and Charles Frederick Hancock. The firm grew in size and prosperity creating wonderful pieces of silverware from tea and coffee pots, salvers and candelabra through to presentation plates and cups as well as ornate and decorative table centre pieces. Their jewellery was equally impressive. They exhibited at the Great Exhibition held in 1851 at the Crystal Palace, London and were granted the Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria. Further exhibitions followed both at home and abroad including New York in 1853 and Paris in 1867. By the 1860’s they were reported to be employing 35 people at the New Bond Street shop and a further 80-100 at the factory on Harrison Street. They also worked in collaboration with a large number of additional craftspeople as well as retailing both jewellery and silver from other workshops such as that of Carlo Giuliano and Robert Hennell. The business continued successfully and Robert Roskell’s son Allan and John Hunt’s son John Mortimer Hunt joined in the firm. After the death of John Hunt in 1879, his son and the two Messrs Roskells continued in partnership until 1888 when Allan Roskell and John Mortimer Hunt took over the business between them. In 1889 the partnership was dissolved and the business was sold to J.W. Benson of Ludgate Hill who kept the name and continued trading under Hunt & Roskell until 1897 when it was converted into a limited company Hunt & Roskell Ltd which remained trading until the 1960s.

  • 1874

    Hunt & Roskell

    8525 Antique Silver Wine Jug

    £975

    A fine antique sterling silver wine ewer of tall shapely vase form having a curved silver handle with acanthus leaf terminal. Plain style and elegant classical shape. Excellent quality and good gauge silver as you’d expect from this prestigious firm of silversmiths, previously known as Storr & Mortimer, the famous Paul Storr partnership. Gilt interior. Contains 1350 ml. Weight 810 grams, 25.1 troy ounces. Height 29.5 cms. Spread 12 cms. London 1874. Maker Hunt & Roskell (late Storr & Mortimer).

  • 1912

    Hunt & Roskell

    8913 Antique Silver Cup and Cover

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    A good quality sterling silver trophy cup and matching cover together with the original ebonised wooden plinth. Tall vase shape with sweeping side handles. Original gilt interior. The cup has many classical features including a deeply embossed band of acanthus leaf scrolls, half fluted body and cast pineapple finial. Weight 3708 grams, 119 troy ounces. Height 51.5 cms (cup and lid without plinth), 36 cms (cup only). Plinth 11 cms. London 1912. Maker Hunt & Roskell Ltd.

  • 1890

    Hunt & Roskell

    8031 Antique Silver Candlesticks

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    An impressive pair of Georgian style sterling silver candlesticks on shaped octagonal spreading bases. These are a copy of a pair made by the celebrated Huguenot maker Paul de Lamerie and the detail is superb. Cast silver. Excellent quality and thick gauge of silver. Total weight 1,268 grams, 40.7 troy ounces. Height 22.5 cms. Base diameter 22.5 cms. London 1890. Maker Hunt & Roskell, late Storr & Mortimer (the famous Paul Storr partnership).

  • 1858

    Hunt & Roskell

    9500 Antique Silver Hunting Jug

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    Of sporting interest. A Victorian sterling silver flagon with hinged lid and scroll handle. The body has a deep relief hunting scene with horses and riders hunting to hounds. The lid has a dog finial. Gilt interior. Contains 1400 ml. Weight 1039 grams. Height 26.5cm. Spread 21.5cm. London 1858. Maker Hunt & Roskell, late Storr & Mortimer.

  • 1881

    Hunt & Roskell

    9721 Victorian Silver Gilt Mirror

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    A fine antique silver gilt dressing mirror of waisted form surmounted by two large putti flanking a monogrammed cartouche. The whole frame has magnificent applied decoration in the rococo revival style; the cast pendant floral sprays to the border are particularly stunning. The wooden easel back has hanging hooks and wire. Height 58.5cm. Width 41cm. London 1881. Maker Hunt & Roskell, late Storr & Mortimer. Numbered 8158. Sterling silver.

  • 1890

    Hunt & Roskell

    9954 Antique Silver Candlesticks

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    An impressive pair of Georgian style sterling silver candlesticks on shaped octagonal spreading bases. These are a copy of a pair made by the celebrated Huguenot maker Paul de Lamerie and the detail is superb. Cast silver. Excellent quality and thick gauge of silver. Total weight 1,268 grams, 40.7 troy ounces. Height 22.5 cms. Base diameter 22.5 cms. London 1890. Maker Hunt & Roskell, late Storr & Mortimer (the famous Paul Storr partnership).

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  • 1815

    Phipps Robinson & Phipps

    9452 Georgian Silver Horns

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    Of sporting interest. A rare pair of sterling silver mounted hunting horns, each bearing the crest of a lion on an oval plaque. The mouthpieces are probably later. They play beautifully. Spread 26cm. Top measures 7×5.8cm. London 1815. Maker Phipps, Robinson & Phipps.

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